Introducing Marketing Research

By Paul Baines; Bal Chansarkar | Go to book overview

Foreword by Robert M. Worcester

Just over thirty years ago Gordon Graham, then Chairman of McGraw-Hill Book Company, asked me to edit the Consumer Market Research Handbook, which in three editions sold nearly twenty thousand copies over more than two decades around the world. Since then, a number of British authors and editors have put together its successors. Now, a very well-balanced, upto-date, text for students and handbook for practitioners has been compiled by Paul Baines and Bal Chansarkar of Middlesex University Business School with the help of a number of other contributors. This, in my view, gives the book its strength, as specialist colleagues at Middlesex have been enlisted to contribute their expertise in their fields, while the conception, organization, much of the writing and the compiling were carried out by Baines and Chansarkar.

For years I've claimed somewhat facetiously that research is a simple business, all that is required is to ask the right sample the right questions and add up the figures correctly. Of course there's much more to it than that. Behind asking the right questions is a subtle blend of psychology, semantics, languages, and logic. To frame a single question isn't simple; to construct a complex questionnaire is always a huge challenge. Still the best book on the subject of survey and questionnaire design, published originally in 1951 by Princeton University Press and now out of print after more than 20 reprints, is Stanley L. Payne's The Art of Asking Questions. I have mentioned his book's title to explain simply what survey research is, as a 'marriage of the art of asking questions and the science of sampling'.

Looking through Introducing Marketing Research, I am pleased to see that Baines and Chansarkar's coverage is more comprehensive and instructive than was our own, especially in our first edition. They start with a useful overview of what market research is and how the industry is organized, which we neglected. Their second chapter gets down to how to go about actually doing a market research survey, explaining the market research process of problem definition, deciding the research plan, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and finally report preparation and presentation. All good stuff, and mostly neglected in the CMRH, all 800-plus pages of it, which in the first edition began with a chapter on qualitative research (Chapter 4 in Baines and Chansarkar) and their Chapter 3, on desk research and secondary data collection, didn't make it into the CMRH until the second edition.

Chapters on Internet research and B2B research are also useful additions, and the former is playing an increasingly important role in data collection; their warnings of representativeness of the sample obtained using the Internet are salutary, and contrast with the careful approaches outlined in Chapter 7, on sampling.

Another useful feature of the book is a comprehensive glossary. This one is 'bang up to date', with not only the definitions of CAPI and CATI, but CAWI as well.

All in all, this book is a good addition to the texts we now have to choose from on the subject of market research. Both the student who learns from this book, and the practitioner who uses it as a guide, will be well served.

Robert M. Worcester, FMRS Chairman, MORI Visiting Professor, LSE

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Introducing Marketing Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 350

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.