Adult Dyslexia: A Guide for the Workplace

By Gary Fitzgibbon; Brian O'Connor | Go to book overview

PREFACE

This book is written for employers, psychologists, trainers, human resource personnel and all professional people who have an interest in, or a responsibility for, adult dyslexia in a work-related context. We decided to write this book because, as practitioners with substantial experience of both advising organisations on adult dyslexia issues and providing assessment, counselling and training services to adult dyslexics, we are very aware that the condition is widely misunderstood in the world of work.

Our background of working in commercial, industrial, educational and public service organisations, together with the special expertise we have developed in adult dyslexia, enables us to describe and explain the problems adult dyslexics face in workplaces and to identify possible solutions to those problems. We have seen many examples that confirm that dyslexics can be very successful in the right environment and that they can fail to realise their potential in the wrong environment. In this book we provide practical advice, for both individuals and employers, concerning what constitutes the right environment, how to create it and how organisations can make the psychological transition from a framework that perceives dyslexia as a problem to one that conceptualises it as a solution.

Although aimed at employers and professionals involved in supporting adult dyslexics in (and into) work, this book will also be of interest to adult dyslexics themselves. By improving personal understanding of how dyslexia manifests itself in workplaces, dyslexic people can encourage, work with and assist their colleagues and employers to understand that dyslexics have a wealth of talent to bring to the world of work. Increasing understanding is a key to the process of creating a more efficient and effective work environment, one which, in all probability, will benefit everyone who uses it.

In writing this book, we gratefully acknowledge the encouragement, help and support we have received from many colleagues and friends. We are particularly indebted to Vivienne Young, Dr Tessa Adams, John Emery, Sarah Douglas, Alison Little, Joseph Fitzgibbon and Vanessa Taylor-Brown, as well as the many adult dyslexic clients who agreed to allow us to describe their experiences to illustrate various points we wanted to make. However, it should be noted that throughout the book the names of the adults have been changed to preserve anonimity. Any resemblance to real persons is a co-incidence.

Gary Fitzgibbon and Brian O'Connor

Fitzgibbon Associates, 39–41 North Road, London, UK

Telephone: 020 7609 7809

Websites: www.adultdyslexia.co.uk

www.fitzgibbonassociates.co.uk

Email: fae@fitzgibbonassociates.co.uk

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Adult Dyslexia: A Guide for the Workplace
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 172

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.