7 Steps to Fearless Speaking

By Lilyan Wilder | Go to book overview

STEP ONE
Experience Your Voice

VoicesI think they must go
deeper into us than other things.
I have often fancied heaven might
be made of voices.

GEORGE ELIOT

Your voice is your fingerprint. It produces a sound that is distinctively yours. It belongs to you, and no one else.

That sound says as much about you as the words you choose. Produced confidently and fully, it can be the mirror of your soul. Produced carelessly, it can detract from what you have to say and even undermine you.

The first step toward fearless speaking, then, is to learn to produce a strong, relaxed voice that is easy to listen to, lively, and compelling. That voice is within you now. It just needs to be set free and kept healthy.

Before anyone else can enjoy your voice, you must learn to enjoy it yourself. To discover its true quality, its range, its power, its subtleties. To feel the strength and fearlessness that come with the free flow of your own sound.

In order to develop your own sound, you need to find it. That means recognizing and accepting your natural voice. You may not sound like James Earl Jones, or Diane Sawyer, or Charles Osgood. You will sound like you. There is a wide range of sound you can explore.

In this chapter, you will begin the search for your true voice. You will learn to relax, to breathe properly, and to produce a pleasing, resonant sound.

-29-

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7 Steps to Fearless Speaking
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • More Praise for 7 Steps to Fearless Speaking *
  • Accolades Amd Affirmations from Students of Lilyan Wilder *
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • The Five Fears 9
  • Let's Get Started 21
  • Step One - Experience Your Voice 29
  • Step Two - Get a Response and Structure Your Thoughts 43
  • Step Three - Establish a Dialogue 61
  • Step Four - Tap Your Creativity 77
  • Step Five - Learn to Persuade 95
  • Step Six - Achieve Your Higher Objective 113
  • Step Seven - Give the Gift of Your Conviction 129
  • The Seven Steps in Action 151
  • Be a Fearless Speaker Every Day 191
  • Appendix A - Voice Work 197
  • Appendix B - If You Need Medical Help 213
  • Acknowledgments 217
  • Index 219
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