7 Steps to Fearless Speaking

By Lilyan Wilder | Go to book overview

STEP FOUR
Tap Your Creativity

Behind making your own stuff
there's another level: making your
own tools to make your own stuff.

STEWART BRAND

To create, says the dictionary, is to make or bring into existence something new, to produce something fresh and unique using imaginative skill.

Our ability to create defines us as humans. It is a power each of us possesses. When it is unleashed and finally allowed to soar, it becomes our life force.

Tapping into your creativity is essential to overcoming your fear of speaking. When you are completely engaged in and enthralled by what you are communicating, when your senses are heightened and your imagination is in high gear, there simply is no room for fear.

And when the fear is gone, speaking in public becomes an exciting experience; it becomes fun! The vistas open to you are endless.

I like the description of how creativity is used in her corporation day by day, offered by Anthea Disney, CEO of Newscorp:

Where I work, creativity is a natural part of the thought process. It's
integral, not separate from what we do every day.

We do it automatically. We do it by instinct but also by training.
We apply it to everything, large and small, from writing clever head-
lines to colossal ideas that extend the empire.

Fearless speakers, too, allow their creative juices to flow freely— indeed, they depend on those juices.

-77-

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7 Steps to Fearless Speaking
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • More Praise for 7 Steps to Fearless Speaking *
  • Accolades Amd Affirmations from Students of Lilyan Wilder *
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • The Five Fears 9
  • Let's Get Started 21
  • Step One - Experience Your Voice 29
  • Step Two - Get a Response and Structure Your Thoughts 43
  • Step Three - Establish a Dialogue 61
  • Step Four - Tap Your Creativity 77
  • Step Five - Learn to Persuade 95
  • Step Six - Achieve Your Higher Objective 113
  • Step Seven - Give the Gift of Your Conviction 129
  • The Seven Steps in Action 151
  • Be a Fearless Speaker Every Day 191
  • Appendix A - Voice Work 197
  • Appendix B - If You Need Medical Help 213
  • Acknowledgments 217
  • Index 219
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