Psychology and Law: Truthfulness, Accuracy and Credibility

By Amina Memon; Aldert Vrij et al. | Go to book overview
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ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr Amina Memon is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Aberdeen. She has a first-class degree in psychology (1982) and a Ph.D. in psychology (1985). Her main areas of expertise are social and cognitive psychology. Dr Memon has published widely on topics such as the investigative interviewing of child witnesses, police interviews, face recognition, eyewitness identification, the performance of elderly witnesses, false memories and jury decision making. Between 1991 and 1997, Dr Memon conducted extensive psychological research on procedures for interviewing child witnesses for the purpose of obtaining complete and accurate witness reports. Dr Memon is co-editor (with R. Bull) of the Handbook of the Psychology of Interviewing (Chichester: Wiley, 1999). Her research is international, with collaborations in North America, Italy and Germany. Her current research projects include the memory of elderly witnesses, jury decision making and false memories. Dr Memon has received funds to support her research from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the National Science Foundation, the British Academy and the Royal Society.

Professor Aldert Vrij is Professor of Applied Social Psychology at the University of Portsmouth. His main area of expertise is deception, mainly the nonverbal and verbal characteristics of deception, and he has published widely on these issues. For conducting this research, he has received grants from the ESRC, the Leverhulme Trust, the Dutch Organisation of Scientific Research (the Dutch equivalent of the ESRC) and the Dutch Ministry of Justice. He gives workshops on deception to police officers in several countries on a regular basis. Other areas of research interest are eyewitness testimony, interviewing children and interviewing suspects. Regarding this latter issue, he sometimes acts as an expert witness in criminal courts. At present, Professor Vrij has published more than 200 articles and book chapters and five books.

Professor Ray Bull is Professor of Forensic Psychology at the University of Portsmouth. His main areas of expertise are police interviewing and the relationship between physical appearance and criminality, topics on which he has published extensively. He is regularly invited to present seminars and lectures to police audiences in many countries. His most recent externally

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