Psychology and Law: Truthfulness, Accuracy and Credibility

By Amina Memon; Aldert Vrij et al. | Go to book overview

INDEX
Achieving Best Evidence 3, 100–2
Adversarial system 169–72
Ageing 110
Age regression 142
Aiding juries 165
Alcohol 173
Amnesia 128–132
Anger 15, 16
“Appropriate adult” 67, 83
Archival data 150, 153
Attempted behaviour control 12–13, 18–19
Attentional resources 114
Attitude change 62, 70
Attributions
attribution theory 152, 161
mental illness 50
responsibility 48, 50
Authority figure 101, 141
Autobiographical memory 134, 138
Autobiographical referencing 140
Autokinetic studies 79
Baby-facedness 53, 55
Battered women 39
Belief change 137–8
Belief perseverance 73
Bluffing 64
Body language 15
Boomerang effect 64
Case studies 130, 150
Child abuse 5, 178–9
Childhood amnesia see Infantile amnesia
Child witness
competency 88, 91
expert testimony 175–6
facial identifications 88, 92–3
individual differences 93, 98–9
intellectually disabled 98
suggestibility 91, 93–9
CIA 27
Civil lawsuits 148
Clinical psychologists 171
Closed questions 67, 105
Clothing bias 120, 122–3
Codes of practice 109
Cognitive demand 41
Cognitive load 12–15, 18
Cognitive resources 110
Cognitive schemata 39
Compliance 79, 84, 103
Commitment effect 117
Communication boards 100
Confidence 111–12
see also Eyewitness
Confessions
coerced-compliant 3, 58, 77
coerced internalized 78
false 76–85
retracted 76, 82
voluntary 3, 25, 77
Confirmation bias 73
Conformity 70, 159
Consistency 111
Contempt of Court Act 148
Content complexity 12, 18–19
Contextual embedding 20
Context reinstatement 118, 134, 137
Control Question Test (CQT) 21, 22, 23, 28
Conversations 9
Convictions 70, 151, 154
Coping strategies 130
Corrective surgery 45
see also Facial …
Countermeasures 15, 21, 33
Court appointed experts 171
Crime seriousness 115
Criminal history 70
Criminal Justice System 4, 40, 109, 120, 174
Criterion Based Content Analysis (CBCA) 19, 26–8, 33, 36
Cross-cultural nonverbal communication error 32
Cross-race bias 116–17, 173
Dangerousness 169
Daubert ruling 170
Deception
behavioural cues 14, 58
definition 7
facial attractiveness 41
physiological 7, 11, 20

-221-

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Psychology and Law: Truthfulness, Accuracy and Credibility
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • About the Authors ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Telling and Detecting Lies 7
  • Chapter 3 - Facial Appearance and Criminality 37
  • Chapter 4 - Interviewing Suspects 57
  • Chapter 5 - Interviewing Witnesses 87
  • Chapter 6 - Psychological Factors in Eyewitness Testimony 107
  • Chapter 7 - False Memories 127
  • Chapter 8 - Jury Decision Making 147
  • Chapter 9 - The Role of Expert Witnesses 169
  • References 181
  • Index 221
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