Confederate Industry: Manufacturers and Quartermasters in the Civil War

By Harold S. Wilson | Go to book overview

NOTES

Preface

1.Among monographs on manufacturing within single Southern states, Mary A. DeCredico emphasizes the pecuniary motives of Confederate business leaders, scarcity of raw materials, and ineffective leadership in Patriotism for Profit. A more detailed study relating planters to business interests is Ernest Lander's The Textile Industry in Antebellum South Carolina. Jerrell H. Shofner and William W. Rogers's "Textile Manufacturing in Florida during the Civil War" has good data on that state. Much literature is found in dissertation form. Richard Griffin's "North Carolina: The Origin and Rise of the Cotton Textile Industry, 1830–1880" has a valuable list of individuals and mills. Other useful studies are Laurel E. Janke Wilson's "Textile Production in Nineteenth Century Orange, Alamance, and Durham Counties, North Carolina," and Percy Love Guyton's "The Government and Cotton to 1862." The latter has extensive and valuable tables on the flow and consumption of the annual crop. Maurice K. Melton's "Major Military Industries of the Confederate Government" and John R. DeTreville's "The Little New South: Origins of Industry in Georgia's Fall Line Cities, 1840–1865," reveal the strengths of urban communities. Randall M. Miller's "The Cotton Mill Movement in AnteBellum Alabama" presents a solid treatment of early industry in that state.

An excellent biography of an important Alabama leader, carefully built on manuscripts, local government records, and newspapers, is Curt John Evans's "Daniel Pratt of Prattville." Evans interprets Pratt in a much more favorable light than the earlier studies of Randall Miller, Wayne Flynt, or Jonathan Weiner, but he also describes an aggressive entrepreneur who both opposed secession and supported slavery.

2. Beatty's careful study describes slaveholding protocapitalists being transformed into a bourgeoisie, with worker class conflicts and a colonial type dependency upon the Northeast.

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