Lorca, Bunuel, Dali: Art and Theory

By Manuel Delgado Morales; Alice J. Poust | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

MIRIAM BALBOA ECHEVERRÍA is a professor of Spanish at Southwest Texas State University. She is the author of Lorca: El espacio de la repre sentación (1986), Boca de dama: La narrativa de Angélica Gorodischer (1995), a play, Doña Catalina (1996), and a book of poetry, Para en tretener a un amante (1999). Her articles have appeared in Gestos, Ro manic Review, Discurso Literario, Mesoamérica, Confluencia, and Unesco.

MANUEL DELGADO MORALES is a professor of Spanish at Bucknell University. A native of Granada, Spain, he is the author of a number of books and articles on the theater of Gil Vicente, Lope de Vega, Guillén de Castro, Calderón de la Barca, Tirso de Molina, Ruiz de Alarcón, Mira de Amescua, and Federico García Lorca. His most recent publication is a critical edition of Pedro Calderón de la Barca's La devoción de la cruz (2000).

SIDNEY DONNELL is an associate professor of Spanish at Lafayette College. His forthcoming book Feminizing the Enemy: Imperial Spain, Transvestite Drama, and the Crisis of Masculinity looks at gender politics in the early modern period by focusing on the deployment of crossdressing in the Spanish comedia. He also researches film, having recently published an article in Modern Language Notes about Luis Buñuel.

LUIS FERNÁNDEZ CIFUENTES is a professor of Spanish at Harvard University. He is the author of numerous books and articles, among them Teoría y mercado de la novela en España (1983) and García Lorca en el teatro: La norma y la diferencia (1986). He is also the editor of Zorrilla's Don Juan Tenorio (1993), Palacio Valdés's Los majos de Cádiz (1998), and Max Aub's Las buenas intenciones and La calle de Valverde (forthcoming).

CANDELAS GALA is a professor and Chair of the Department of Romance Languages at Wake Forest University. A native of Santander,

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