The Book of Psalms: Composition and Reception

By Peter W. Flint; Patrick D. Miller Jr. | Go to book overview

THE PSALMS OF DAVID: DAVID IN THE PSALMS

ROLF RENDTORFF


PSALMS WITH HEADINGS THAT MENTION DAVID

Almost half the psalms bear a headline including the name of David: in the Hebrew canon 73 of the 150 psalms, and in the Septuagint an additional 14, including the 151st psalm which is “out of count.” The superscriptions vary remarkably, but what all have in common is the phrase

The exact meaning of this formulation is contested. It appears to be a rather formulary phrase that can be used by itself, as well as in different combinations with other words or phrases or even sentences. It appears thirty-five times in the formula usually translated “a psalm of David.” This formula can be extended to a sentence, for example, “when he fled from his son Absalom” (Ps 3:1“0”), or “when he was in the Wilderness of Judah” (63:1 “0”). In these cases is obviously understood as naming David to be the author of the psalm. This is even more evident in cases like Ps 18:1(0), where is followed by “who spoke to Yhwh the words of this song.”

In later tradition David is seen to be the author of the psalms in general. 2 Mace 2:13 mentions the “writings of David,” and according to the large Qumran scroll (HQPsa col. 27) David “wrote” and “spoke” no less than 3,600 psalms (

) and 450 “songs” ( ). In the New Testament several times psalms are quoted as spoken by David “by the Holy Spirit” (Mark 12:36, cf. Acts 1:16) or “in the book of Psalms” (Luke 20:42, cf. Act 2,25, 4:25, Rom 4:6, 11:9). In rabbinic literature David as author of the “five books of Psalms” is compared to Moses as the author of the “five books of the Torah” (Midr. Tehillim to 1:2, cf. b.Baba Batra 14b, 15a; b.Pesachim 117a).

But what David is it who could be seen as the author of psalms1 and even as “the sweet singer of the songs of Israel” (2 Sam 23: l)?2 Is it

1 “An essay on a subject like 'The David of the Psalms' ¡s a sign of what is
going on in biblical studies in our time.” (J. L. Mays, “The David of the Psalms,”
¡nterp 40 “1986” 143-155, here 143)

2 The NRSV understands this verse differently.

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Book of Psalms: Composition and Reception
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 684

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.