The Book of Psalms: Composition and Reception

By Peter W. Flint; Patrick D. Miller Jr. | Go to book overview

LAMENT AND THE JOY OF SALVATION
IN THE LAMENT PSALMS
SUNG-HUN LEECommentators on the lament psalms are usually impressed by their remarkably sombre tone. Yet readers of Individual Lament Psalms would also be struck by the fact that along with an extended preoccupation with great present distress in the midst of suffering and affliction there appears, interspersed, the expression of assurance in God's salvation. It would be even more surprising that the Individual Lament psalms, in most cases, end jubilantly in abrupt praise of God. This sudden transition is clearly seen in Psalm 57:The Petitioner's Petition:
1. Be merciful to me, O God, be merciful to me for in you my soul takes refuge; in the shadow of your wings I will take refuge.
2. 1 cry to God Most High, to God who fulfils his purpose for me.
3. He will send from heaven and save me; he will put to shame those who trample on me. Selah.
4. .1 lie down among lions that greedily devour human prey; their teeth are spears and arrows, their tongues sharp swords.
5. Be exalted, O God, above the heavens, let your glory be over all the earth.
6. They set a net for my steps; my soul was bowed down. They dug a pit in my path, but they have fallen into it themselves.
“Transition”The Petitioner's Expression of Confidence (or Praise):
7. My heart is steadfast, O God, my heart is steadfast. I will sing and make melody.
8. Awake, my soul! Awake, O harp and lyre! I will awake the dawn.
9. 1 will give thanks to you, O Lord, among the peoples; I will sing praises to you among the nations.
10. For your is as high as the heavens; your faithfulness extends to the clouds.
11. Be exalted, O God, above the heavens, let your glory be over all the earth. (NIV)

Though this abrupt shift in mood in the lament psalms has long been discussed by scholars, no satisfactory explanation has yet been

-224-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Book of Psalms: Composition and Reception
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 684

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.