Christology, Controversy, and Community: New Testament Essays in Honour of David R. Catchpole

By David G. Horrell; Christopher M. Tuckett | Go to book overview

FIRST-CENTURY HOUSES AND Q'S SETTING

Peter Richardson


Introduction

Setting in Judaism

David Catchpole argues that “in terms of the fundamental beliefs of Judaism the Q Christians were a conservative grouping”, marked by a concern for “inclusion and association and inseparability” from features of Judaism such as the temple.1 Though Pharisaism concerns them, the woes do not separate Q's community from either temple or law (p. 276). “The tradition seems throughout to be comfortable within Judaism, uneasy about Pharisaism, and, in view of the rarity of any comment on the authority of the law (Q 16:17), not at all preoccupied with the problem which threatened to tear apart other early Christian communities” (p. 277); “we have a picture of a community whose outlook was essentially Jerusalem-centred, whose theology was Torah-centred, whose worship was temple-centred, and which saw (with some justice) no incompatibility between all of that and commitment to Jesus” (p. 279).2 This conservatism should neither be equated with nor set against Pharisaism, nor any specific group within Judaism; it may merely express a “common— and conservative—Judaism”, characteristic of many Jews.3

The realia of early Christianity and second-Temple Judaism, as exposed in recent archaeological research in the Galilee and the Golan, suggest that Catchpole's views are correct.4 This present

1 David R. Catchpole, “Tradition and Temple”, chapter 9 in The Quest for Q
(Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1993) 256–79, originally published in W. Horbury, ed.,
Templum Amicitiae: Essays on the Second Temple presented to Ernst Bammel (JSNTSup 48;
Sheffield: JSOT, 1991) 305–29. This quotation is from pp. 256–7.

2 See also C.M. Tuckett, “Q (Gospel Source)”, in ABD 5.567–72, especially
570–71. “Q's polemic is directed against only a part of the Jewish community
among which the Q community existed” (p. 570).

3 E.P. Sanders, Judaism, Practice and Belief, 63 BCE-66 CE (London: SCM/
Philadelphia: TPI, 1992) Part II.

4 Peter Richardson, “Enduring Concerns: Desiderata for Future Historical-Jesus
Research”, in William E. Arnal and Michel Desjardins, eds, Whose Historical Jesus?
(ESCJ 7; Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1997) 296–307.

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Christology, Controversy, and Community: New Testament Essays in Honour of David R. Catchpole
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 404

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.