Christology, Controversy, and Community: New Testament Essays in Honour of David R. Catchpole

By David G. Horrell; Christopher M. Tuckett | Go to book overview
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OPENLY PORTRAYED AS CRUCIFIED:
SOME OBSERVATIONS ON GAL 3:1–14

Peder Borgen

It is a privilege and a pleasure for me to contribute an essay to the Festschrift in honour of my treasured colleague and good friend David Catchpole. I got to know him at the annual meetings of the Studiorum Novi Testamenti Societas, especially during the period when he was its Secretary. Catchpole demonstrated that it is possible to combine outstanding and firm leadership with a gracious and caring attitude towards colleagues. When SNTS accepted the invitation to have one of its General Meetings at our University in Trondheim, it was a great experience to work together with him in the planning and carrying out of the conference. Later he arranged a guest lecture tour for me to several universities in the United Kingdom and Ireland. The tour was a very memorable experience for my wife and myself. When we visited the University of Exeter, we had the pleasure of staying in his home, meeting the family and experiencing their generous and warm hospitality. Both then and at conferences it has been good to talk and share both as colleagues and as friends.

When Paul in 1 Cor 15:3ff. quoted a Christological tradition that he had received, the death of Jesus was referred to in the following words: “that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures” (v. 3).

In a recent essay I discussed the wording “in accordance with the Scriptures”. I argued that the meaning was broader and more general than that of the Scriptures providing one or more proof texts. In support for this understanding I mentioned the parallel phrase “in accordance with the Law”. The preposition used,

, introduces the norm according to which something takes place. In connection with the death of Jesus, John 18:31 offers a good parallel.

1 P. Borgen, “'In accordance with the Scriptures'”, in J.M.G. Barclay and J.P.M.
Sweet, eds, Early Christian Thought in Its Jewish Context FS Morna Hooker (Cambridge:
CUP, 1996) 193–206.

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