Egypt, Israel, and the Ancient Mediterranean World: Studies in Honor of Donald B. Redford

By Gary N. Knoppers; Antoine Hirsch | Go to book overview

JUDAEANS (AND PHOENICIANS) IN EGYPT IN THE LATE
SEVENTH TO SIXTH CENTURIES B.C.1

John S. Holladay, Jr.


Abstract

Late seventh/early sixth century decanters (highly stylized jugs; pl. 1), variously made of native Egyptian and Judaean clay sources, have been found at a number of sites in the Nile delta. In the absence of other Judaean ware-forms or other visible imports from southern Palestine, this poses a problem for archaeological explanation. On the basis of inscribed Judaean examples and the distribution of this vessel in Judaean archaeological settings, it is proposed (a) that they are wine-decanters, the personal property of heads of families, and therefore archaeological “markers” (Holladay 2001) of a resident Judaean trading and refugee diaspora (Curtin 1984; below) broadly dispersed over the delta, and, presumably, up the Nile; (b) that they functioned in rituals (Sabbath meals) serving to maintain the communities' characteristic religious beliefs and practices with the tacit goal of uniting the community and ensuring its long-term survival in a foreign environment. It is not impossible that a continuation of rituals involving female figurines and their appurtenances (model animals, horse-and-rider figurines, model lamps in model trees, doves, etc.) is also part of some members of the community's religious praxis, although the characteristic Judaean pillar-based figurines have not yet appeared. These goals, together with native language retention, doing long-range business on an extended “family” basis, and communal enforcement of quality and trading standards, are typical for all trading diasporas. It is further proposed that (c), these expatriate traders resided in company with other “foreign” diasporas: in the present instance, with a dominant Phoenician diaspora. This, too, is a regular characteristic of trading diasporas.

1 For a compelling survey of the mechanisms and conduct of long-distance trade in
world history see Curtin (1984). While Curtin is understandably general with respect
to the ancient Near East, some of the mechanisms of foreign diasporas involved in
ancient long-distance trade and attendant craft specializations, together with their
“markers” in the archaeological record, are explored in Holladay (1997) and with
more direct attention to economic theory in Holladay (2001, with references).

-405-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Egypt, Israel, and the Ancient Mediterranean World: Studies in Honor of Donald B. Redford
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 596

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.