Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period : 330 B.C.-A.D. 400

By Stanley E. Porter | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 14
THE RHETORIC OF ROMANCE

Ronald F. Hock

University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA

The ancient romances, long neglected and frequently despised by classical specialists, are now attracting the attention of ever increasing numbers of scholars. In fact, the romances have become “one of the hottest properties in town”,1 as E. L. Bowie and S.J. Harrison put it in their review of scholarship on the ancient novel over the last twenty five years.2


I. The Ancient Romances and Related Fiction

The romances, to put it briefly, are typically stories about two extraordinarily beautiful young people who fall in love, but who, before they can live happily ever after, must overcome various temptations, hardships, and humiliations.3 Five such stories have survived intact

1 E. L. Bowie and S.J. Harrison, “The Romance of the Novel”, JRS 83 (1993),
pp. 159–78 (quotation on p. 159).

2 For their excellent review of this scholarship, see Bowie and Harrison, “Ro-
mance”, esp. pp. 161–66. Current scholarship is regularly collected, and often an-
notated, in G. Schmeling's indispensable The Petronian Society Newsletter (=PSN), now
in its twenty-fifth year. B. P. Reardon is preparing a comprehensive review of schol-
arship, to be published in Lustrum and due out in 1995 or 1996 (see Bowie and
Harrison, “Romance”, p. 161).

3 The best single volume introduction to the romances is usually considered to be
T. Hagg, The Novel in Antiquity (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1983). But
two recent volumes deserve mention: J. R. Morgan and R. Stoneman (eds.), Greek
Fiction: The Greek Novel in Context (New York: Routledge, 1994), and N. Holzberg, The
Ancient Novel: An Introduction (New York: Roudedge, 1995). Among earlier accounts,
see esp. E. Rohde, Der griechische Roman und seine Vorläufer (3rd edn.; Leipzig: Breitkopf
und Hartel, 1914); B. E. Perry, The Ancient Romances: A Literary-Historical Account of
their Origins (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1967); and B. P. Reardon, Courants
littéraires grecs des IIe et IIIe siicles après J.-C. (Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1971), pp. 309-
403. For short introductions, see B. P. Reardon, “The Greek Novel”, Phoenix 23 (1969),
pp. 291–309, and E. L. Bowie, “The Greek Novel”, in P. Easterling and B. Knox
(eds.), The Cambridge History of Classical Literature. I. Creek Literature (New York: Cambridge
University Press, 1985), pp. 683–99.

-445-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period : 330 B.C.-A.D. 400
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 902

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.