Restoration: Old Testament, Jewish, and Christian Perspectives

By James M. Scott | Go to book overview

JEWISH-CHRISTIAN CHILIASTIC RESTORATION IN PSEUDO-
CLEMENTINE RECOGNITIONS 1.27–71

Stanley Jones
California State University, Long Beach


INTRODUCTION

This essay presents rare and neglected evidence for early JewishChristian chiliastic hopes for restoration. It focuses particularly on the distinctively Jewish-Christian material preserved in PseudoClementine Recognitions 1.27–71. Justification for this seemingly narrow focus is twofold: On the one hand, historical research over the last century and a half has mounted to give critical mass to the view that Recognitions 1.27–71 has a distinctive Jewish-Christian origin, i.e., is a special source.1 On the other hand, some of the perspectives and beliefs expressed in this source are so remarkable that they call for a reevaluation of knowledge about earliest Christian expectations generally. Thus, discussion of the views of Recognitions 1.27–71 will readily open out into the vast realm of early Christian hopes for restoration.2

1 The material was originally isolated by Adolf Hilgenfeld in 1848, who
identified it as the heart of the conjectured Kerygma(ta) Petrou (Die
clementinischen Recognitionen und Homilien, nach ihrem Ursprung unci Inhalt
dargestellt [Jena: J. G. Schreiber; Leipzig: Chr. E. Kollmann, 1848] 52). Gerhard
Uhlhorn, R. A. Lipsius, and Hans Waitz contributed to the distinction between
this material and the Kerygmata Petrou. This distinction was solidified in the
work of H. J. Schoeps and Georg Strecker, which in turn opened the door for
studies focused specifically on this source. Two largely independently pursued
monographs have since been devoted to this Jewish-Christian material, one by
Robert Van Voorst and one by myself. For a complete history of research up to
1995 and for bibliographical details, see my An Ancient Jewish Christian Source
on the History of Christianity: Pseudo-Clementine 'Recognitions' 1.27–71
(SBLTT 37; Christian Apocrypha 2; Atlanta, GA: Scholars Press, 1995) 4–34.

2 No attempt will be made here to document the literature on the topic. Ref-
erences will thus be either exemplary or indicative of special material and
insights.

-529-

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