The Road to Abolition? The Future of Capital Punishment in the United States

By Charles J. Ogletree; Austin Sarat | Go to book overview

About the Contributors

JAY D. ARONSON is Assistant Professor of Science, Technology, and Society in the History Department at Carnegie Mellon University. His research and teaching focus on the interactions of science, technology, law, and human rights in criminal justice and post-conflict resolution contexts. His first book, titled Genetic Witness: Science, Law, and Controversy in the Making of DNA Profiling, examines the development of forensic DNA analysis in the American legal system. He received his Ph.D. in History of Science and Technology from the University of Minnesota and was both a predoctoral and postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government.

SIMON A. COLE is Associate Professor of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine, where he teaches a course on capital punishment. He received his bachelor's degree in History from Princeton University and his Ph.D. in Science and Technology Studies from Cornell University. He is the author of Suspect Identities: A History of Fingerprinting and Criminal Identification and a coauthor of Truth Machine: The Contentious History of DNA Fingerprinting. He is a member of the American Judicature Society Commission on Forensic Science and Public Policy.

DEBORAH W. DENNO is the Arthur A. McGivney Professor of Law at Fordham Law School. She has published books and articles concerning a broad range of areas relating to criminal law, including the death penalty. For nearly two decades, she has written on, and testified in state and federal courts about, the constitutionality of lethal injection and electrocution. In 2007, she was selected as one of the National Law Journal's “Fifty Most Influential Women Lawyers in America.”

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