Electronic Elections: The Perils and Promises of Digital Democracy

By R. Michael Alvarez; Thad E. Hall | Go to book overview
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BIBLIOGRAPHY

Alden, Robert. 1952a. “30% of Soldiers in Korea Voting.” New York Times, 3 November, 1.

———. 1952b. “Stevenson Leads by 2–1 in Poll of 500 U.S. Army Men in Korea.” New York Times, 1 November, 1.

Alvarez, R. Michael. 1997. Information and Elections. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

———. 2005a. “Precinct Voting Denial of Service.” Prepared for NIST “Threats to Voting Systems” Workshop. Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project Working Paper 39.

———. 2005b. “Threats to Statewide Voter Registration Systems.” Paper prepared for NIST “Threats to Voting Systems Workshop.” Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project Working Paper 40.

Alvarez, R. Michael, Stephen Ansolabehere, and Charles Stewart III. 2005. “Studying Elections: Data Quality and Pitfalls in Measuring of Effects of Voting Technologies.” Policy Studies Journal 33 (1): 15–24.

Alvarez, R. Michael, Melanie Goodrich, Thad E. Hall, D. Roderick Kiewiet, and Sarah M. Sled. 2004. “The Complexity of the California Recall Election.” PS: Political Science and Politics 37 (January): 23–27.

Alvarez, R. Michael, and Thad E. Hall. 2004. Point, Click, and Vote. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press.

———. 2005a “Rational and Pluralistic Approaches to HAVA Implementation: The Cases of Georgia and California.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 35: 559–77.

———. 2005b. The Next Big Election Challenge: Developing Electronic Data Transaction Standards for Election Administration. IBM Center for the Business of Government, Washington, D.C.

Alvarez, R. Michael, Thad E. Hall, and Brian F. Roberts. Forthcoming. “Military Voting and the Law: Procedural and Technological Solutions to the Ballot Transit Problem.” Fordbam Law Review.

Alvarez, R. Michael, Thad E. Hall, and D. E. Sinclair. 2005. “Whose Absentee Votes Are Counted: The Variety and Use of Absentee Ballots in California.” California Institute of Technology. Unpublished manuscript.

Alvarez, R. Michael, Morgan Llewellyn, and Thad E. Hall. 2007. “How Hard Can It Be: Do Citizens Think It Is Difficult to Register to Vote?” Stanford Law and Policy Review 18: 382–409.

———. Forthcoming a. “Are Americans Confident Their Ballots Are Counted.” Journal of Politics.

———. Forthcoming b. “Who Should Run Elections in the United States.” Policy Studies Journal.

Alvarez, R. Michael, D. E. Sinclair, and Richard L. Hasen. 2006. “How Much Is Enough? The Ballot Order Effect and the Use of Social Science Research in Election Law Disputes.” Election Law Journal 5(1): 40–56.

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