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The Persuadable Voter: Wedge Issues in Presidential Campaigns

By D. Sunshine Hillygus; Todd G. Shields | Go to book overview

Appendix 2

Content Analysis Coding

Candidate Speeches

Coding of candidate speeches relied on the Annenberg/Pew Archive of Presidential Campaign Discourse, which contains the transcripts of speeches from September 1 through Election Day for the two major party nominees 1952 through 1996, with the exception of Barry Goldwater.

In calculating the speeches related to racial policies from 1960 through 1976, as reported in chapter 5, the following subject categories were used: affirmative action; African Americans; Brown v. Board of Ed- ucation; busing; civil rights; bigotry; criminal justice, African Americans; desegregation; discrimination; ethnic/racial discrimination; equal opportunity; ethnic/racial education; employment discrimination; employment quotas; employment, minorities; equal opportunity; housing discrimination; integration; discrimination military personnel; minorities, business; minorities, employment; minorities, unemployment; minorities, prejudice; ethnic/racial quotas; race relations.

To code the total number of issues addressed by presidential candidates across this time, reported in chapter 6, a sample of thirty speeches (fifteen from each candidate), excluding nomination speeches, was randomly selected from the Annenberg/Pew Archive of Presidential Discourse for each election year. Research assistants then calculated the number of issues in the speech sample using the issue categories from the Campaign Communication Study, adding additional categories as necessary.


2004 Presidential Direct Mail

The data for the 2004 presidential direct mail came from the Campaign Communication Study conducted by the Center for the Study of Elections and Democracy (CSED) at Brigham Young University. The field work for the Campaign Communication Study was conducted by the Social and Economic Sciences Research Center (SESRC) at Washington State University, and followed the method for mail and mixed mode surveys in Don Dillman's book, Mail and Internet Surveys: The Tailored

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