Church and State in Tanzania: Aspects of Changing Relationships, 1961-1994

By Frieder Ludwig | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN

GROWING ECUMENISM

7.1. The Protestant Church Union Discussions after Independence

“Nguvu yetu ni umoja“—”our strength is unity”, was one of the catchphrases in Tanzanian politics after independence. This also had implications for the internal affairs of the religious bodies: Since the leaders of the young state stressed cooperation and harmony, denominational rivalries and quarrels were regarded as threats to national unity.1 It is therefore no mere coincidence that attempts to unite the different Protestant denominations were intensified during the time immediately after independence.

Early attempts—as during the ill-fated Kikuyu Conference of 1913 for instance—had failed, but the initiative started in 19592 tried to make use of previous experiences.3 In August 1961 an informal twoday discussion was held in Dodoma. The participants included Lutherans, Mennonites, Moravians and Anglicans who had been united in the Church of the Province of East Africa just a short time previously. Since the formation of this Church, which included both Kenya and Tanzania and had been a successful but complex balancing act of the various forces within the Anglican Church, the Anglicans were very concerned that Kenya should also be included in the East African Church Union. Talks began in Limuru (Kenya) and the first conference took place at Ilburu at the beginning of 1963. As a

' L. Marquardt, “Katholische Kirche und Mission” in: E. Jaeschke (ed.), Zwischm
Sansibar und Serengeti. Lutherische Kirche in Tansania
(Erlangen, 1968, pp. 202–214), p.
212.

2 It is not quite clear from the literature who was responsible for the initiative. G.
Jasper, “The East African Church Union Discussions”, Africa Theological Journal
(1968/1) p. 51 refers to a letter of the Vice-President of the Lutheran Church of
Northern Tanganyika, Dr. E. Danielson, as starting point, while C.G. Oosthuizen,
Theological Battleground in Asia and Africa. The Issues facing the Churches and the Efforts to
Overcome Western Divisions
(London, 1972), p. 332 points out that the Christian Council
took the initiative.

3 The East African Church Union Consultation, Interim Basis of Union (Kikuyu,
Kenya, 1965) refers to the Kikuyu-Conference of 1913 “when missionaries from
Kenya and Uganda of the Anglican, Methodist and Presbyterian Churches and the
interdenominational Africa Inland Mission approved a draft constitution for a,
Scheme of Federation of Missionary Societies in British East Africa.”'

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Church and State in Tanzania: Aspects of Changing Relationships, 1961-1994
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 288

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.