God's Kingdom and God's Son: The Background in Mark's Christology from Concepts of Kingship in the Psalms

By Robert D. Rowe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
THE MESSIANIC KINGSHIP OF JESUS IN MARK

In this chapter we are considering the following question: does Mark's gospel show evidence of any intrinsic links between his presentation, on the one hand of Jesus as Messiah, and on the other hand of the kingdom of God being manifested through Jesus? We have seen that the ideas of the kingdom of God and Messiahship are both rooted in the Old Testament, albeit that they were developed in varying ways in inter-testamental expectation. We shall therefore consider Mark's presentation of Jesus in relation to Old Testament passsages that may have been interpreted messianically, and then see how closely those are linked with the concept of God's kingship.


1. Preliminary: the Question of Jesus' Identity in Mark

We should first make the point that the identity of Jesus is the primary question of Mark's gospel. We see this question voiced by Jesus' opponents (2:6-7; 11:27-28), and particularly at Jesus' trial by the high priest (14:61) and by Pilate (15:2). Jesus asks questions about himself (8:27, 29; 10:18). The gospel also contains questions about Jesus by his disciples (4:41), his own countrymen (6:2-3), and by Herod, whose opinion that Jesus is John the Baptist returned to life is set in the context of popular speculation as to Jesus' identity (6:14-16; cf. 8:27-28). The last three examples fit into a general pattern of astonishment shown by Jesus' disciples and the crowd in response to Jesus' authoritative teaching and mighty works.' Mark thus shows throughout his gospel that the words and deeds of Jesus raised the question, “Who then is this?” (4:41).

A clear answer is given in Mark's prologue (1:1-13) to the question of Jesus' identity.2 The divine voice calls him, “my beloved Son” (verse 11), while Mark in his first sentence gives his own testimony to

1 See 1:27; 2:12; 4:41; 5:20, 42; 6:2, 51; 7:37; 9:15; 10:24, 26, 32; 12:17. Cf. T.
Dwyer, 'The Motif of Wonder in the Gospel of Mark', JSNT57 (1995), pp. 49-59.

2 On the importance of the prologue for Mark, cf. R.H. Lightfoot, The Gospel of St.
MOTt (1950), pp 15ff.;J.M. Robinson, The Problem of History in Mark (1957), pp 21-32;
B. Standaert. L'evangile selon Marc: Commentaire (1983), p. 42; F.J. Matera, 'The Pro-
logue as the Interpretative Key to Mark's Gospel', JSNT 34 (1988), pp. 3-20. Many

-229-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
God's Kingdom and God's Son: The Background in Mark's Christology from Concepts of Kingship in the Psalms
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 438

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.