The Early History of Mechanical Engineering - Vol. 1

By Bryan Lawton | Go to book overview

LIST OF FIGURES
Fig. 1.1An application of the lever. The shaduf, or well sweep, used for lifting water.
Fig. 1.2Top: weighing ingots from the tomb of Rekhmire, vizier to Tuthmosis III and Amenophis II. c. 1450 B.C. Luxor. Bottom: weighing gold, c. 1450 B.C.
Fig. 1.3Left: Egyptian balance of Cotterell and Kamminga. Right: Egyptian balance with a simple plumb line.
Fig. 1.4A simple Roman balance and Roman steel-yard. Reconstructed from originals found at Pompeii, 79 A.D.
Fig. 1.5Left: an Egyptian torsion press from the Great pyramid at Giza. Right: an improved torsion (bag) press.
Fig. 1.6Greek beam press.
Fig. 1.7Ramelli's method for hauling artillery up steep inclines.
Fig. 1.8The inclined plane at Fusina.
Fig. 1.9Pappus's theory of the wedge.
Fig. 1.10Wedge-press (right), operated by cherubs, for extracting fine olive oil for use in a perfumery. Black Room of the House of the Vettii at Pompeii, 79 A.D.
Fig. 1.11Top: construction and proportions of the water screw according to Vitruvius. Bottom: Ramelli's drawing of an Archimedean screw.
Fig. 1.12Heron's hodometer.
Fig. 1.13Relief showing slaves treading grapes.
Fig. 1.14Heron's device for cutting female screw threads. Rotating the boring bar B cuts the female thread. The wedge C adjusts the depth of cut. The pegs F engage in the external screw on the boring bar.
Fig. 1.15Relief showing slaves operating a winepress.
Fig. 1.16A screw-jack with extension foot for lifting a door from its hinges.
Fig. 1.17The toolmaker. Diderot and d'Alembert (1751–72).
Fig. 1.18a and b Simple pulleys. c. Compound pulley system.
Fig. 1.19Sketch of the crane described by Vitruvius. After Drachmann (1963, 143).

-xv-

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The Early History of Mechanical Engineering - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Technology and Change in History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Figures xv
  • List of Tables lvii
  • Acknowledgements lxi
  • Preface lxvii
  • Mechanics 1
  • Chapter One - Machine Elements 3
  • Chapter Two - Power Transmission 55
  • Power Generation 111
  • Chapter Three - Power, Food and Slavery 113
  • Chapter Four - Muscular Work and Power 151
  • Chapter Five - Muscle Technology 181
  • Chapter Six - Waterpower 223
  • Chapter Seven - Wind and Other Power Sources 283
  • Transport 341
  • Chapter Eight - Characteristics of Transport 343
  • Chapter Nine - Land Transport 399
  • Chapter Ten - Theory of Land Transport 455
  • Chapter Eleven - Water Transport 507
  • Chapter Twelve - Ship Technology 579
  • Chapter Thirteen - Undersea and Aerial Transport 625
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