School Neuropsychology: A Practitioner's Handbook

By James B. Hale; Catherine A. Fiorello | Go to book overview

Index
ABAB/ABAC designs, 153, 154
Ability measures, interpretation, 11, 18, 23
Achenbach Teacher Report Form, 27
Achievement tests, 10, 11
Afferent projections, 45
Age equivalents, 99, 100
Agraphia. See Handwriting problems
Aimline, 157
Algorithm errors, 211, 218
Allographic conversion, writing, 229
Ambiguity, right-hemisphere function, 199, 200
American Sign Language learning, 72
Americans with Disabilities Act, 38, 39
Amygdala
and autism, 253
and emotional valence, 46, 248
Angular gyrus
and mathematics disorders, 217, 218
phoneme–grapheme association, 229
and reading disorders, 188, 194, 195
structure and function, 59, 60
Anterior cingulate circuit, 64, 66
Anterior–posterior axis. See Posterior– anterior axis
Anxiety, 263–268
Aphasia, and left–right axis, 72, 73, 75, 76. See also Broca's area; Wernicke's area
Apperceptive agnosia, 109
Approach–avoidant system, 266
Aptitude–treatment interactions
and “paradigm-shift” position, 13, 40, 178
practitioner's guide, 40, 41
reading disorders, 201
Arithmetic difficulties, 214, 215
Arithmetic subtest (WISC-IV), 33
Asperger syndrome, 254–257
assessment and treatment, 254–257
autism differentiation, 254–257
Assessment-intervention link, 18, 19, 40, 41, 128–176
Associative agnosia, 109
Association visual cortex, 52, 53
Astereognosis, 108
Asymmetrical brain, 70
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, 268-281. See also Hyperactive– impulsive ADHD; Inattentive ADHD
case studies, 275–281
characteristics and comorbidities, 268–273
diagnosis and treatment, 272–281
differential diagnosis, 247, 269–273
frontal–subcortical circuits role, 270–272
interdisciplinary evaluation of, 247
and mathematics disorders, 213, 214, 269
case study, 219–222
and nonverbal learning disorder, 259
reading disorders comorbidity, 184, 192
Attentional processes, worksheet, 174, 175
Atypical development, continuum, 86
Auditory processes
deficits, 187–189
temporal lobe pathways, 56–59
Autism, 253–257
Asperger syndrome differentiation, 254–257
characteristics and treatment, 253, 254
Automatic processes. See Novel– automatic processes
Basal ganglia, structure and function, 46
Behavior Assessment System for Children—Teacher Rating Scale, 27
Base rate considerations, 115
Baseline measurement, 152
Behavior
left–right axis in, 249
neuropsychological basis, 246–250
Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, 146
Behavior Assessment System for Children—Student Observation System, 26
Behavioral activation system, 249, 250
Behavioral inhibition system, 249, 250
Behavioral strategies, 144, 147–160
basics of, 149–151
definition, 144, 147
medication interaction, ADHD, 275, 276
Behavioral observation. See Direct observation
Bipolar disorder, 265
Blind spots, visual, 53
Block Design subtest (WISC-IV)
autism and Asperger syndrome, 255
demands analysis, 131–133
Boston Naming Test, 147
Boston process approach, 104, 105
Brain development
and assessment, 85–88
typical and atypical, 44, 45, 86
Brain plasticity, 44, 45
Brain trauma
“benign” vs. long-term effects, 68
and conduct disorder, 265, 267
Brainstem, structure and function, 46, 47

-323-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
School Neuropsychology: A Practitioner's Handbook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 329

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.