Zora Neale Hurston and a History of Southern Life

By Tiffany Ruby Patterson | Go to book overview

Introduction

Rootedness—The History of Private Life

I could blend the acceptance of the supernatural and a
profound rootedness [emphasis added] in the real world
at the same time with neither taking precedence over
the other. It is indicative of the cosmology, the way in
which Black people looked at the world. We are very
practical people, very down-to-earth, even shrewd peo-
ple. But within that practicality we also accepted what I
suppose could be called superstition and magic, which is
another way of knowing things. But to blend those two
worlds together at the same time was enhancing, not
limiting. And some of those things were “discredited
knowledge” that Black people had; discredited only
because Black people were discredited therefore what
they knew was “discredited.” And also because the press
toward upward social mobility would mean to get as far
away from that kind of knowledge as possible.

—Toni Morrison, “Rootedness:
The Ancestor as Foundation”1

ZORA NEALE HURSTON is a much-misunderstood historical figure. She faithfully chronicled black life—most notably the lives of working- and lower-class black women and men, especially in the rural South, but her very role as chronicler has been used to denounce her as a traitor to her race. Although her works stand among the richest documentary sources on black life, labor, and culture in the early twentieth-century South, most

-5-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Zora Neale Hurston and a History of Southern Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Prologue 1
  • Introduction - Rootedness—the History of Private Life 5
  • 1: Reconstructing Past Presents 19
  • 2: Portraits of the South: Zora Neale Hurston's Politics of Place 32
  • 3: A Place Between Home and Horror 50
  • 4: Sex and Color in Eatonville, Florida 90
  • 5: A Transient World of Labor 128
  • 6: Patronage: Anatomy of a Predicament 159
  • Epilogue 183
  • Notes 185
  • Index 217
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.