Millennial Makeover: Myspace, Youtube, and the Future of American Politics

By Morley Winograd; Michael D. Hais | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

THE IDEAS, thoughts, and words of this book are most definitely those of the authors. But any work of this scope is, ultimately, a team effort, and for this reason we want to acknowledge a number of individuals without whom this book could not have been written.

We, and anyone who wants to have a clearer understanding of American history and society, owe a large intellectual debt to William Strauss and Neil Howe. Nearly two decades ago we read their wellresearched, perceptive, and seminal book Generations. It was a “Eureka” moment for us both. That initial reading provided an amazingly clear understanding of the ebb and flow of America's past and its future. At that time, both of us vowed to apply the Strauss and Howe generational framework to the aspect of American life about which we are most passionate—politics. We renewed that commitment following their publication of The Fourth Turning in 1997. This book is the fulfillment of that pledge.

As we proceeded, Dr. Elaine Kamarck of Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government freely offered valuable insights and perceptive comments that demonstrated her deep knowledge of American politics and government. We have also had the pleasure of trading political opinions with Dudley Buffa, who provided us extremely useful suggestions on how to organize the book.

We particularly want to thank several institutions and individuals for graciously allowing us full access to high-quality survey data before and during our research for this book. We appreciate the generosity of Dr. David C. King, research director at Harvard University's Institute of Politics. David kindly provided the results of the Institute's excellent surveys of the Millennial Generation and, equally important, his deep understanding of the political attitudes and behavior of this crucial

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