Racial Justice in the Age of Obama

By Roy L. Brooks | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
LIMITED SEPARATION

A. OVERVIEW

IN HIS MEMOIR, Colored People,1 Henry Louis Gates Jr. reminisces about a rich personal and communal life growing up in a pre-integrated community in West Virginia. Teachers cared about their students, families functioned well, and blacks looked out for one another. Things changed after integration. The black high school and the corn mill, where many blacks worked, were shut down. They were considered “too segregated” and, hence, illegal under the ruling in Brown v. Board of Education and its progeny.2 With each closing of a black institution, the community's “womblike colored world” disappeared. Forced to jettison the identity that had bonded them together for so long, young blacks found it difficult to adapt. Integrated schools were alien and unwelcoming, jobs became hard to find, and sharp divisions developed in the black community of Piedmont, West Virginia. None of the blacks wanted segregation, but none regarded their high school or the corn mill as “segregated.” As the 1970s unfolded, blacks began to realize that the community's “most beloved, and cementing, ritual was doomed to give way.”3 What was lost was a “colored world [that] was not so much a neighborhood as a condition of existence.”4 To Gates and other blacks in this sweet community, “the soul of the world was colored”—the mainstream was black.5

The virtues of black-mainstream communities have been recognized by none other than Condoleezza Rice, who served as secretary of state and national security adviser in the Bush II administration. Born and raised in the segregated South, Rice resents the white-shaped narrative of pre-integrated black communities: “What I always disliked was the notion that blacks were somehow saved by people who came down from the North to march. You know, black Americans in Birmingham and in Atlanta and places like that were thriving and educating their children and being self-reliant and producing the right values in those families and in those communities.”6 One of the best discussions of black values can be found in The African American Book of Values, a collection of writings on the black experience edited by Steven Barboza.7

This awareness of the benefits derived from black-mainstream communities provides the inspiration for a post–civil rights theory called “limited separation.” This theory envisions voluntary racial isolation that is racially nonexclusiveand available to all racial groups, not just to blacks. Thus, limited separa

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Racial Justice in the Age of Obama
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Traditionalism 14
  • Chapter 3 - Reformism 35
  • Chapter 4 - Limited Separation 63
  • Chapter 5 - Critical Race Theory 89
  • Epilogue: Toward the “best” Post–civil Rights Theory 109
  • Appendix Disparate Resources in America by Race in the Post–civil Rights Era 125
  • Notes 183
  • Bibliography 211
  • Index 225
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 237

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.