The Future of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia

By Neil M. Gorsuch | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

THERE ARE many people to whom I am indebted. John Finnis provided thoughtful comments on, and kind support through, draft after draft. John Keown, Dan Callahan, and Timothy Endicott offered valuable input in many areas and support in seeing this project through to completion. Richard Posner, Richard Epstein, Daniel Klerman, Christian Mammen, and Todd Zubler also took the time to review and offer insightful suggestions on portions of what eventually came to form this book. Bryan and Prue Burletson provided years of encouragement.

Draft portions of the manuscript previously appeared as articles: The Legalization of Assisted Suicide and the Law of Unintended Consequences, 2004 Wisconsin Law Review 1347 (2004), and The Right to Assisted Suicide and Eu thanasia, 23 Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy 599 (2000). I am grateful to both journals for their permission to reproduce what was previously published in their pages. Laura Schulteis and Laura Dickman of the Wisconsin Law Review also made substantial contributions to much of the material that forms the basis of chapter 7.

I would like to thank Robert George and Chuck Myers of Princeton University Press for their support and interest in this book, as well as Mark Bellis and Anita O'Brien for her help in editing the manuscript. Michael Pucci and Tom Humphries provided helpful research assistance, and the Marshall Scholarship Commission made much of the research on which this book is based possible through its generous financial assistance. Yet once again, I am deeply indebted to Bernadette Murphy and Jessica Bartlow for their excellent editorial assistance and unflappable good humor through long hours and days. Despite so much help from so many generous friends and colleagues, I alone am responsible for errors that remain and the views expressed here are, of course, mine alone—not those of any other person or entity.

Finally, and borrowing in part from P. G. Wodehouse, I thank my wife, Louise, and my daughters, Emma and Belinda, without whose constant love and attention this book would've been finished in half the time—but without whom life would've been half as fully lived.

-xi-

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