Lincoln on Race and Slavery

By Henry Louis Gates Jr.; Donald Yacovone et al. | Go to book overview

18

Speech At Kalamazoo, Michigan:
CW, 2:361–366

Roughly two months after the first Republican National Convention, Lincoln campaigned in Kalamazoo, Michigan, for the newly nominated John C. Frémont against the Democratic nominee, James Buchanan. “The question of slavery,” explained Lincoln, “should be not only the greatest question, but very nearly the sole question.” He sought to focus public attention on one fundamental issue: should slavery be permitted to expand into the territories as allowed by Senator Douglas's Kansas-Nebraska Act? “This is the naked question.” But for Lincoln and his fellow Republicans, who carefully distanced themselves from abolitionism, the real issue appeared to be how to keep the territories open for “the homes of free white people.” Lincoln also singled out the Richmond Enquirer, a highly influential semiweekly newspaper founded by Democratic activist Thomas Ritchie in 1804. From 1855 to 1857, the Enquirer featured several editorials by the proslavery ideologue George Fitzhugh, some unsigned, justifying the institution of slavery regardless of color and suggesting that Southern slaves lived better than working-class whites in the North. Lincoln used Fitzhugh's writings as a warning to the North of “the Southern view of the Free States” and the ultimate tendency of a slave society.

August 27, 1856

Fellow countrymen:—Under the Constitution of the U.S.
another Presidential contest approaches us. All over this
land—that portion at least, of which I know much—the
people are assembling to consider the proper course to
be adopted by them. One of the first considerations is to
learn what the people differ about. If we ascertain what
we differ about, we shall be better able to decide. The

-84-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lincoln on Race and Slavery
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 346

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.