Lincoln on Race and Slavery

By Henry Louis Gates Jr.; Donald Yacovone et al. | Go to book overview

29

Speech At Carlinville, Illinois:
CW, 3:77–81

The address at Carlinville, delivered at the invitation of John M. Palmer, a Sangamon County lawyer and Republican activist, occurred between the second and third debates with Senator Douglas. Lincoln opened with the sobering declaration that the crisis over slavery had been ignited in 1854, ironically, by Douglas's attempt to halt the agitation over slavery with the Kansas-Nebraska Act. As he would throughout his political career, Lincoln invoked the intention of the Founding Fathers to gradually eliminate slavery, and even cited the example of Laurence M. Keitt, a fire-eating, proslavery congressman from South Carolina, who once expressed the belief that slavery could not last. Lincoln emphasized his conservative Whig credentials and ridiculed his opponent's attempt to wrap himself in the legacy of Henry Clay. More pointedly, Lincoln took the opportunity to repudiate Douglas's characterizations of his racial views and stood irrevocably on the ground of racial segregation. He quoted from his own important speech at Peoria to guarantee that he would not be mistaken: “'Shall we free them and make them politically and socially our equals? MY OWN FEELINGS WILL NOT ADMIT OF THIS.' ” Douglas constantly taunted Lincoln's party with the label of “Black Republicans” and charged that it secretly promoted “amalgamation.” Lincoln, however, reminded his audience that racial mixing took place precisely where slavery was the strongest. Slavery, not freedom, promoted race mixing; thus, according to Lincoln, the best way to halt amalgamation was to stop the spread of slavery. Focusing on the racial implications of the Supreme Court's decision in Dred Scott, President James Buchanan's subservience to the South, and Douglas's views, Lincoln warned that slavery's expansion meant white men would lose jobs. “Sustain these men,” Lincoln warned, “and negro equality will be abundant, as every white laborer will have occasion to regret when he is elbowed from his plow or his anvil by slave niggers.”

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lincoln on Race and Slavery
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 346

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.