Charter Schools: Hope or Hype?

By Jack Buckley; Mark Schneider | Go to book overview

7

School Choice and the Importance
of Parental Information

ONE OF THE CENTRAL BATTLEGROUNDS in the fight over school choice is information: Who has it? Who uses it? To what effect? In this chapter we review some of the relevant theories regarding how individuals gather and use information about politics, public goods, and schools. This sets the background for the analysis we present in the next chapter, where we explore how parents gather and use information about schools using data from our web site, DCSchoolSearch.com (described in chapter 5).

The arguments over choice have taken on many dimensions but, at their core, many rest on the link between choice and the (presumed) superiority of markets. Proponents of choice, whose contributions range from those of seminal economist Milton Friedman (1962) to the work of traditional education researchers such as Goldring and Shapira (1993), to the neoinstitutional work of political scientists Chubb and Moe (1990), have advanced strong normative arguments in favor of parent/consumer sovereignty. While coming from diverse perspectives, these works share the belief that by expanding the right to choose, parents and students will be more satisfied with the education they receive. Furthermore, the argument continues, under the pressure of consumer demand, schools will improve, boosting student performance and the overall quality of American education.

In response, others have argued that choice programs may not provide the efficiency gains assumed by supporters, and that choice may further erode an already inequitable education system (see, for example, Henig 1994; Smith and Meier 1995a). At the theoretical center of this debate is the reasoning of neoclassical microeconomics, market theory, and the efficacy of consumer choice. As we noted in chapter 1, asymmetries of information play a central role in this aspect of the debate over school choice. Here the debate centers on who has information about schools and how choice will affect the acquisition and use of information.

Even proponents of school choice recognize that the information requirements of fully formed competitive markets will likely not be met in the market for schools. Education is a difficult product to describe and people will continue to disagree about the outcomes by which to judge its quality: Is it test scores? Self-esteem? Graduation rates? Earnings? Socialization into democratic norms? The list goes on.

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Charter Schools: Hope or Hype?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 342

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.