Charter Schools: Hope or Hype?

By Jack Buckley; Mark Schneider | Go to book overview

12

Do Charter Schools Promote Citizenship
among Students?

THE “COMMON-SCHOOL” MOVEMENT OF THE 1840s placed public schools center stage as the most important provider of civic education in the United States. While the leaders of this movement, “school men” like Horace Mann and Henry Barnard, had a variety of goals for public education (Goldin and Katz 2003), the influx of immigrants to the nation in the second half of the nineteenth century created a perceived need to socialize the newcomers to American values and made citizenship education a central task of the public-school system (Perkinson 1991). Over a century later, schools continue to be seen as important in this endeavor by a large proportion of the American population (see, for example, Moe 2001, 86–91; Hochschild and Scovronick 2003, 9–27), and this attitude is embodied in Macedo's observation that “good citizens are not simply born that way, they must be educated by schools” (2000, 16).

The perceived link between schools and good citizenship also affects policy makers. A body of research suggests that service and activism by students are associated with lifelong civic engagement involving voting, trust in government, and participation in voluntary organizations, so it is probably not surprising that many policy makers and educators now call upon school districts to implement programs requiring students to perform service as a way of building civic capacity and promoting democratic citizenship (see, for example, Youniss, McLellan, and Yates 1997; Jennings 2002; Metz and Youniss 2003; Stewart, Settles, and Winter 1998).

It is also not surprising that citizenship education and the political socialization of American youth is a long-standing topic of interest to an interdisciplinary community of researchers, including philosophers, sociologists, political scientists, psychologists, and scholars of education.1 However, such interest has been somewhat cyclical. Beginning in the late 1950s with the seminal work of Hyman (1959), the topic attracted considerable research attention, but fell out of favor by the early 1980s. The last decade, however, witnessed a resurgence of interest in the topic (see, for example, Galston 2001; Niemi and Hepburn 1995; Niemi and Junn 1998; Verba, Schlozman, and Brady 1995).

One reason for the renewed interest is the accumulating evidence of a decline in civic participation and political involvement in the United

-245-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Charter Schools: Hope or Hype?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 342

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.