The Lincoln Assassination: Crime and Punishment, Myth and Memory

By Harold Holzer; Craig L. Symonds et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4

Lincoln's Chief Avenger: Judge
Advocate General Joseph Holt

Elizabeth D. Leonard

[A]mong those great men who in those trying days gave
themselves, with entire devotion, to the service of their country,
one who brought to that service the ripest learning, the most
fervid eloquence, the most varied attainments, who labored with
modesty and shunned applause, who in the day of triumph sat
reserved and silent and grateful … was Joseph Holt, of
Kentucky.

—James G. Blaine1

THE MAN WHO PRESIDED OVER THE TRIAL OF THE LINCOLN assassination conspirators as Judge Advocate General was a lifelong Democrat who, four years earlier, played a crucial role in saving his and the late president's common native state—Kentucky—for the Union.

Joseph Holt was born two years before his fellow Kentuckian in Breckinridge County, Kentucky, on January 6, 1807, the son of John and Eleanor Stephens Holt. As a young child Holt attended a neighborhood school. Then, when he was fourteen, Holt's wealthy and ambitious slaveholding parents sent the bright and articulate young Joseph off to school—first to St. Joseph's College in Bardstown and then to the prestigious and expensive Centre College in Danville. Following his graduation, Holt studied law in Lexington with Robert Wickliffe, and by 1828, at the age of twenty-one, he and his partner, Benjamin Hardin, opened their first law office in Elizabethtown, not far from where Lincoln himself had been born.

-115-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Lincoln Assassination: Crime and Punishment, Myth and Memory
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 264

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.