The Fallacy of Campaign Finance Reform

By John Samples | Go to book overview

Index
Page numbers in italics refer to figures and tables
527 groups, 143–44, 250, 353n. 20, 354nn. 31, 32; Club for Growth, 261, 353n. 24; liberalizing agenda for, 261–63, 270, 281
Abscam scandal, 85
access, 138–39, 157, 160–63, 318n. 82; negative campaign and, 122–23, 128
Ackerman, Bruce, 282–83, 360n. 103
activists, 144– 45
actual corruption standard, 113
Adams, Sherman, 85
advertising: 1997 bill, 245; anticircumvention measures, 250–51; educational, limits on, 35–36; express advocacy, 251; issue ads, 4, 35–36, 251–52; Political Broadcast Act of 1970, 337–38n. 1; rates, 11–12, 199; soft money funding of, 250–52. See also negative advertising/ campaigning
affirmative action, 102
affluent, political views of, 140–42
African Americans, voting rights, 102
agency problem, 242
agricultural subsidies, 156
Alexander, Herbert, 341n. 34, 344n. 80
Almanac of American Politics, 240
altruism, 310n. 186
ambassadorships, selling of, 215, 216
American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), 152–53, 328n. 64
American Economic Association, 45, 303n. 24
Americans for Democratic Action (ADA), 147, 148–49, 241
analogy (Plato), 111–12
Anderson, Jack, 214
Anderson, John, 180
Annenberg Center, 252
Ansolabehere, Stephen, 89, 91, 93–94, 97–98, 278, 313n. 23, 314n. 38
anticircumvention rationale, 250–51, 258, 263, 266, 286, 362n. 117
anticorruption rationale, 255, 286
anti-Federalists, 22
appearance of corruption, 111–13, 117, 160, 257, 319n. 11; mandatory disclosure and, 275–77
Aristotle, 18
Arizona, 146
Associated Milk Producers, Inc., 214, 216
association, freedom of, 28–29, 40
Ayres, Ian, 282–83, 360n. 103
Balkin, J. M., 309n. 166, 311–12n. 198
ballot, secret, 282, 360nn. 102, 105
banking legislation, 98–100
Barnard, Doug, 98
Barnard amendment (1991), 98–99
Barnes, Fred, 325n. 22
Barnett, Randy, 25, 361n. 111
Barone, Michael, 353n. 20
Batten, Samuel, 51
Bauer, Robert F., 294n. 29, 349n. 23, 351n. 49
Bayh, Evan, 251

-363-

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