Exporting Security: International Engagement, Security Cooperation, and the Changing Face of the U.S. Military

By Derek S. Reveron | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

THIS BOOK HAS BEEN A WORK in progress for many years, and I am grateful to Joan Johnson-Freese for encouraging me to complete it and for creating an environment where I can be a practitioner-scholar.

A number of Naval War College colleagues were generous with their time. In particular, Nick Gvosdev and Mac Owens provided great comments on chapter 2, which was revised for Orbis (Summer 2009). My officemate, Jim Cook, was an invaluable sounding board throughout the process. Jim and Mike Todd kept me focused on the implications of global security cooperation for how the military trains and equips. Paul Smith and Dana Struckman graciously reviewed several early chapters. Gunfighter Mike Mahony was my sparring partner on the proper use of the military. Sean Sullivan patiently discussed the intricacies of defense acquisition processes. Larry Dinger, Gene Christy, Debbie Bolton, and John Cloud shared their insights on the embassy country team. And Larry McCabe provided me many opportunities to participate in mil-to-mil engagement by helping U.S. partners develop strategies and strengthen professional military education, and by immersing me in security cooperation activities.

My students, as always, kept my argument sharp and my evidence convincing. In particular, I am grateful to Forrest, Mark, Brian, John, Tamara, and Tim.

The security assistance officers that I worked with continue to be the unsung heroes of U.S. military strategy, and I thank them all for sharing their experiences and insights with me.

The anonymous reviewers and the editorial staff at Georgetown University Press were helpful. In particular, I am grateful for Don Jacobs's support through the writing process.

Finally, but not least, I thank Kirie, who continues to create a rich environment for me to think, research, and write. Without a strong family, I would not have had the time for the necessary travel to conduct this research or finish this book.

-xv-

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Exporting Security: International Engagement, Security Cooperation, and the Changing Face of the U.S. Military
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Acronyms and Abbreviations xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Beyond Warfare 11
  • 2: Military Engagement, Strategy, and Policy 31
  • 3: Resistance to Military Engagement 55
  • 4: Demilitarizing Combatant Commands 79
  • 5: Security Cooperation 101
  • 6: Promoting Maritime Security 123
  • 7: Implications for the Force 145
  • 8: From Confrontation to Cooperation 169
  • Index 185
  • About the Author 205
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