Exporting Security: International Engagement, Security Cooperation, and the Changing Face of the U.S. Military

By Derek S. Reveron | Go to book overview

4

Demilitarizing
Combatant Commands

IN CONTRAST TO POPULAR PERCEPTION, the real power in the U.S. military is not headquartered at the Pentagon. Instead, it is located at six geographic combatant commands located in Florida, Hawaii, Colorado, and Germany. With numerous changes in law, policy, and the perceptions of the security environment during the last half century, combatant commands have replaced the military services in prominence. Based on the president's Unified Command Plan, these combatant commands are responsible for planning and executing all military operations from major war to security assistance. Consequently, the officers who serve as combatant commanders have emerged as key leaders within the U.S. military and within the government's national security bureaucracy.

With major war a relative rarity today, combatant commands are changing to focus on security assistance and are incorporating civilian capabilities into their command structures. Key to this strategic approach is the need to build partners' security capacity to confront local challenges before these challenges create national or regional instability. For Adm. James Stavridis, who has commanded forces in the Western Hemisphere and now commands U.S. and NATO forces in Europe, “The security of the United States and that of our partners depends largely on our capacity to leverage joint, international, interagency, and public-private cooperation, all reinforced by focused messaging and strategic communication.”1 Chile's former president Michelle Bachelet agrees, “The U.S. can make an enormous contribution in this new stage of global development by helping deepen hemispheric cooperation and political dialogue. If successful, this will lead to a better future for our peoples.”2

Stavridis and Bachelet make clear that national security can no longer be guaranteed by preparation for military confrontation with other countries. Instead, international cooperation is at the root of national and international security. The shift from confrontation to cooperation represents a profound change in the use of the military. This chapter explores the implications of this change by analyzing how the structure and function of combatant commands are changing,

-79-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Exporting Security: International Engagement, Security Cooperation, and the Changing Face of the U.S. Military
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Acronyms and Abbreviations xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Beyond Warfare 11
  • 2: Military Engagement, Strategy, and Policy 31
  • 3: Resistance to Military Engagement 55
  • 4: Demilitarizing Combatant Commands 79
  • 5: Security Cooperation 101
  • 6: Promoting Maritime Security 123
  • 7: Implications for the Force 145
  • 8: From Confrontation to Cooperation 169
  • Index 185
  • About the Author 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 205

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.