Mussolini in the First World War: The Journalist, the Soldier, the Fascist

By Paul O'Brien | Go to book overview

6
War and Revolution
March-October 1917

Fascism must not only not oppose the agricultural masses, but must help them remove
their centuries-old and sacred hunger for the land.

Mussolini, Il fascismo nel 1921, 7 January 1921

When, in 1917, a few Italians were sticking it out in the trenches, the men of anti-
fascism were endeavouring to stab them in the back with the revolt of Turin.

Mussolini, Speech to the Senate, 2 April 1925

And if there had been a government which had imposed a severe discipline within,
which had dispersed with a whip the evil genius of the draft dodgers, and had severely
punished the defeatists and traitors with the necessary lead in the back, today the
history of the Italian war would have only luminous pages.

Mussolini, Speech in Milan, 25 October 1932


Nation, War and Revolution, May-June 1917

Down to February 1917 the war had created a sharp polarity for Mussolini between the nation and its enemies. The international politics of the conflict had been simplified further following the Italian declaration of war on Germany in August 1916. But Mussolini's worldview became considerably more complex in March 1917 when the Russian Revolution destabilized the Entente, reinforced the currents of anti-war dissent in Italy, and posed the question of how the faltering Italian military effort might best be galvanized anew to redeem the soldiers' sacrifice and achieve the imperial goals for which Mussolini had so ardently advocated Italy's entry into the war. Revolution, in short, gave a new dynamic to the war and its impact on Italian politics, and it was this that preoccupied Mussolini as he fully reassumed the role of political journalist that he had partly placed in abeyance when he became a soldier. Although he had episodically acted as a political agitator during his eighteen months as a soldier, and had consciously constructed a war diary for political ends, much of his attention had been occupied by the creation of the persona of an exemplary warrior and the incarnation of the élite of the trenches. Now he was not only free to pursue his role as the leading journalist and

-123-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mussolini in the First World War: The Journalist, the Soldier, the Fascist
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Figures vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Stating the Programme November 1918-June 1919 11
  • 2: Man of Straw July 1914-May 1915 31
  • 3: Mind and Matter May-November 1915 59
  • 4: Digging in November 1915-June 1916 87
  • 5: Disenchanted Warrior July 1916-February 1917 107
  • 6: War and Revolution March-October 1917 123
  • 7: Victory Imagined October 1917-November 1918 141
  • 8: Envisioning Fascism October 1917-November 1918 163
  • Conclusion 183
  • Bibliography 189
  • Index 201
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.