Dada Culture: Critical Texts on the Avant-Garde

By Dafydd Jones | Go to book overview

Assaulting the Order of Signs

Anna Katharina Schaffner

Abstract: “Even signs must burn”, Jean Baudrillard programmatically proclaimed in
1972. More than fifty years earlier, the Dadaists in Zürich and Berlin both poetically
effectuated and theoretically anticipated Baudrillard's call for the assault upon the
order of signs as a strategy of cultural intervention. The Dadaists shattered the order
of discourse, dissected language on different levels of linguistic organisation and
waged a cultural war at the level of signs by means of giving priority to the signifiers
at the cost of the signifieds. They withdrew the most fundamental prerequisite of
cultural consensus: the adherence to given linguistic laws. The points of convergence
of Baudrillard's notion of the radical implications of attacking the order of the
dominant code and the Dadaists' poetic practice, theoretical incentives and revo-
lutionary intentions, are striking indeed and entangled in a complex web of antici-
pation, practical realisation and theoretical radicalisation. But is the assault on the
order of signs doomed to remain a merely symbolic gesture of protest, or is there
more to it?


1. Dada and Baudrillard: points of convergence

“Even signs must burn”, Jean Baudrillard programmatically proclaimed in 1972 (1981: 163). More than fifty years earlier, the Dadaists in Zürich and Berlin both poetically effectuated and theoretically anticipated Baudrillard's call for the assault upon the order of signs as a strategy of cultural intervention. The Dadaists shattered the order of discourse, dissected language on different levels of linguistic organisation and waged a cultural war at the level of signs by means of giving priority to the signifiers at the cost of the signifieds. They withdrew the most fundamental prerequisite of cultural consensus: the adherence to given linguistic laws. The points of convergence of Baudrillard's notion of the radical implications of attacking the order of the dominant code and the Dadaists' poetic practice, theoretical in-

-117-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dada Culture: Critical Texts on the Avant-Garde
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 327

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.