Getting Played: African American Girls, Urban Inequality, and Gendered Violence

By Jody Miller | Go to book overview

Notes

NOTES TO CHAPTER I

1. McCall, 1994, p. 44

2. McCall, 1994, pp. 44, 50.

3. Rodriguez, 1993, p. 121.

4. For exceptions, see Benson et al., 2003; Bourgois, 1996; Dugan and Apel, 2003; Dugan and Castro, 2006; Lauritsen and Schaum, 2004.

5. Britton, 2000; Daly and Chesney-Lind, 1988; Smart, 1976.

6. Felson's (2002) research has been particularly controversial in this regard. For critiques, see Kruttschnitt, 2002; Simpson, 2002.

7. Of course, it's impossible to provide an adequate list of citations for this substantial body of scholarship. Susan Brownmiller's (1975) Against Our Will is certainly a classic early work (though not without its critics). There is now an interdisciplinary journal, Violence against Women, on the issue, and numerous other key works, many of which can be found in my discussions throughout this book.

8. For an overview, see Renzetti et al., 2001.

9. For a systematic treatment of this issue, see Davis, 1981.

10. Collins, 1990; Davis, 1981; hooks, 1981; Spelman, 1989.

11. In fact, several factors have hindered research on violence against young women in urban African American communities. The most obvious is the ease of access in interviewing college students and adults, compared with the difficulties inherent in interviewing underage youths about sensitive topics (Schwartz, 1997). Two additional factors are noteworthy. First is the tendency to study inner-city youths primarily in terms of their perceived deviance—as delinquents, teen mothers, school dropouts (for discussions, see Chesney-Lind, 1993; Gibbs, 1990; Leadbeater and Way, 1996). Second, this is combined with widespread stereotypes about violence against women that define some victims as “innocent” and deserving of attention, while others are seen as more culpable for their victimization. White middle-class women assaulted by strangers are at one end of the continuum, while urban African American young women—especially those involved (or perceived to be involved) in other risk behaviors—are at the other (Estrich, 1987; Walsh, 1987). As a consequence, our knowledge of

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Getting Played: African American Girls, Urban Inequality, and Gendered Violence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.