Virtual Freedom: Net Neutrality and Free Speech in the Internet Age

By Dawn C. Nunziato | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I WAS FORTUNATE TO HAVE THE SUPPORT OF MANY COLLEAGUES and family members in writing this book. I am grateful to my dean, Fred Lawrence, for his encouragement and generous financial support, as well as for his careful reading of and thoughtful comments on many drafts; to Professor Jerome Barron for his inspiration, advice, and guidance; to the participants of The George Washington University Law School Works in Progress Series, Vanderbilt Law School's The Internet Meets the First Amendment Conference, University of North Carolina Law School's Cyberspeech Symposium, and American University Washington College of Law's Distinguished Faculty Colloquium, especially Tony Varona; to Jonathan Lowy for his expert advice, constant encouragement, and editorial assistance; to Todd Peterson, for his patience and his insightful comments on many drafts, especially on Chapters 5 and 7; to Ellen Goodman, for her careful reading and expert commentary and critique; to Padmaja Balakrishnan, for tireless and outstanding secretarial support; to Brian Day, Megan Matthews, Michelle Rosenthal, Aaron Johnson, Bryan Mechell, Jeremy McGinley, and Jordan Segal for excellent research assistance; to Leonard Klein and Matthew Braun for superb library research assistance; and to Frances and Joseph Nunziato, for their advice on many versions of the book cover. Finally, I am indebted to the supportive and diligent editors at Stanford University Press, especially Kate Wahl and Joa Suorez, and to David Home of Classic Typography, for expert editorial assistance.

-xi-

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Virtual Freedom: Net Neutrality and Free Speech in the Internet Age
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1: Speech and Censorship on the Internet 1
  • 2: The First Amendment's Free Speech Guarantee 24
  • 3: Embracing the Affirmative First Amendment 41
  • 4: A Place to Speak Your Mind1 70
  • 5: When Private Becomes Public 88
  • 6: Speech Conduits and Carriers 115
  • 7: Protecting Free Speech in the Internet Age 134
  • Conclusion 152
  • Reference Matter 157
  • Notes 159
  • Index 191
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