Synthetic Worlds: The Business and Culture of Online Games

By Edward Castronova | Go to book overview

10
TOPOGRAPHIES OF TERROR

So far, the chapters in part 2 have focused on core questions of political economy—business, markets, governments, law—as these are affected by the unique features of synthetic worlds. One area that has been overlooked so far, and yet that is closely related to the issues of governance that dominated the last chapter, involves violence. In well-governed communities, violence is generally not sanctioned, and it ought to be rare between well-governed communities as well. Unsanctioned violence within a community is crime; violence between communities is warfare. Terrorism occupies a gray area between the two. It turns out that synthetic worlds, because of the way they warp reality and enable real-time communications, provide some rather frightening opportunities for people of bad intent. They also make it more difficult for security forces to respond. This chapter will focus on the use or misuse of synthetic world technology for violent conflicts outside the membrane. The next chapter will focus on violent conflicts that may fall inside the membrane.


Just Another First-Person Shooter Game

A corridor is lit by a single light bulb hanging from a wire. The few doors here are closed and the people in the corridor, two African American men and a Jew, stand here aimlessly, as if they are waiting for something. Indeed, whatever they are waiting for seems to be approaching: around the corner, somewhere in the farthest depths of the building, guns are being fired, and their outbursts are audible here. Over time, the reports get louder. The occupants of this corridor now begin to hear the cries of wounded and dying people; the moment of doom nears them. Yet they do not run, and suddenly all is silent. The sound of footsteps can be

-227-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Synthetic Worlds: The Business and Culture of Online Games
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 332

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.