Liberation Theologies in the United States: An Introduction

By Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas; Anthony B. Pinn | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This project required the support and assistance of many people, without whom this volume you now hold would still be nothing more than a few thoughts jotted down and stored in a file named “Liberation Theology BK.” While we cannot in this confined space thank all who have played a role in bringing this book to you, we mention a few. The volume editors thank Jennifer Hammer, our editor at New York University Press, for shepherding this project through its various phases.

We also acknowledge and thank our fellow liberationists who, by example, have been an ongoing source of courage, collegiality, insight, strength, and wisdom. Thank you to James Cone, Katie Cannon, Peter Paris, M. Shawn Copeland, J. Deotis Roberts, Miguel De La Torre, Ada María IsasiDíaz, Kwok Pui Lan, Kelly Brown Douglas, Linda Thomas, Sharon Welch, Mayra Rivera, Cheryl Kirk-Duggan, Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, and Guston Espinoza.

Our classes at Macalaster College, Virginia Tech University, Brite Divinity School, Rice University, and Vanderbilt Divinity School have given us the opportunity to work through the precepts of liberation theology in dialogue with concerned and interested parties. It is in the living laboratory of the classroom that we were able to work through the type of praxis required by liberation theology. We thank our students for their serious engagement of the material. It is their energy and commitment that inspired us to continue work on this project during some of the more difficult moments. In addition, we thank our diligent and astute research assistants, Chris M. Driscoll and Jacob Robinson, for their tireless work in the management of this text and the student assistance of Shauna St. Clair. Each of them is a budding liberationist in his and her own right, and we are grateful for their assistance with several stages of work on this volume.

In addition, we thank our families, especially the life and legacy of Anne H. Pinn, Mary Elizabeth and Sidney Underwood, Charles Floyd, Jerome Floyd, and Greg Floyd. And the presence of love poured out from Lillian

-ix-

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Liberation Theologies in the United States: An Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Black Theology 15
  • 2: Womanist Theology 37
  • 3: Latina Theology 61
  • 4: Hispanic/Latino(A) Theology 86
  • 5: Asian American Theology 115
  • 6: Asian American Feminist Theology 131
  • 7: Native Feminist Theology 149
  • 8: American Indian Theology 168
  • 9: Gay and Lesbian Theologies 181
  • 10: Feminist Theology 209
  • Contributors 227
  • Index 231
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