Liberation Theologies in the United States: An Introduction

By Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas; Anthony B. Pinn | Go to book overview

4

Hispanic/Latino(a) Theology

BENJAMÍN VALENTÍN


Historical Backdrop

Even though it has existed alongside other theologies of liberation and alongside other forms of contextual religious discourse since at least 1975, Hispanic or Latino theology still remains unknown or undiscovered by many in the wider arena of theological and religious scholarship.1 I suppose that this neglect is related to and continues a long history of disrespect toward Latino/as and of their being rendered invisible or insignificant in the United States. However, I suspect that the neglect of Latino/a theology could also be tied to the failure to make a distinction between it and Latin American liberation theology. In other words, it is possible that people who study, follow, or do theology may mistakenly identify, equate, or lump together Latino/a theology with the liberationist theologies that have emerged in Mexico and in the Spanish-speaking countries of the Caribbean Basin and of Central and South America. But this is a faulty assumption, not only because each of the theological expressions that has emerged from these countries on the southern side of the U.S.-Mexican border deserves mentioning and study in its own right but also because Hispanic/Latino(a) theology should be seen as a distinctive form of theological colloquy in itself.

Although influenced in certain respects by the mode of liberation theology or justice-seeking theological address that emerged in different parts of Latin America, Latino/a academic theology exemplifies the religious and theological inflections of Hispanic people living in the United States of America. In other words, Latino/a theology is a North American theological tradition—a theological tradition that is bred and based in the United States. This theological voice flows from the thought, writings, and activities of a heterogeneous group of theologians, comprised of people who can trace their ancestry in some way or another to different parts of Spanish-speaking Latin America but yet call the United States their home. The written and oral presentations of this group of theologians deserve attention and apprecia-

-86-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Liberation Theologies in the United States: An Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Black Theology 15
  • 2: Womanist Theology 37
  • 3: Latina Theology 61
  • 4: Hispanic/Latino(A) Theology 86
  • 5: Asian American Theology 115
  • 6: Asian American Feminist Theology 131
  • 7: Native Feminist Theology 149
  • 8: American Indian Theology 168
  • 9: Gay and Lesbian Theologies 181
  • 10: Feminist Theology 209
  • Contributors 227
  • Index 231
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.