Liberation Theologies in the United States: An Introduction

By Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas; Anthony B. Pinn | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

STACEY M. FLOYD-THOMAS is currently the Associate Professor of Ethics and Society at Vanderbilt University Divinity School and Graduate Department of Religion. A graduate of Vassar College (B.A.), Emory University’s Candler School of Theology (M.T.S.), and Temple University (M.A. and Ph.D.), she is an ordained American Baptist and Progressive National Baptist pastoral counselor and cofounding executive director of the Black Religious Scholars Group (BRSG). Her research and teaching interests lie at the intersection of liberation theology and ethics, feminist/womanist studies, critical pedagogy, critical race theory, and postcolonial studies that engage broad questions of moral agency, cultural memory, ethical responsibility, and social justice. She has published three books—Mining the Motherlode: Methods in Womanist Ethics (2006), Deeper Shades of Purple: Womanism in Religion and Society (2006), and Black Church Studies: An Introduction (2007)—and is the editor of two series with New York University and Abingdon Presses. She has received numerous honors and awards, including the JPMorgan Chase/Texas Business Press Great Women of Texas Award and the American Academy of Religion Excellence in Teaching Award.

MARY MCCLINTOCK FULKERSON is currently Professor of Theology at Duke Divinity School. An ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA), she received her Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University. Her primary teaching interests are feminist theologies, theology and culture theories, and authority in theology. Her work is published in journals such as the Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, and Modern Theology. Her book Changing the Subject: Women’s Discourses and Feminist Theology examines the liberating practices of feminist academics and nonfeminist churchwomen. She has written articles challenging theologies that identify normative Christianity with heterosexuality. Her recent book Traces of Redemption: Theology for a Worldly Church interprets the doctrine of the church in light of racial diversity and the differently-abled.

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Liberation Theologies in the United States: An Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Black Theology 15
  • 2: Womanist Theology 37
  • 3: Latina Theology 61
  • 4: Hispanic/Latino(A) Theology 86
  • 5: Asian American Theology 115
  • 6: Asian American Feminist Theology 131
  • 7: Native Feminist Theology 149
  • 8: American Indian Theology 168
  • 9: Gay and Lesbian Theologies 181
  • 10: Feminist Theology 209
  • Contributors 227
  • Index 231
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