You Call This An Election? America's Peculiar Democracy

By Steven E. Schier | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
FOUR CONTROVERSIES

Four disputes over the electoral system have garnered extensive attention in recent years. The four sources of controversy are the electoral college, state and local election administration, the decennial census count and legislative redistricting procedures, and U.S. House districts drawn according to the racial characteristics of state populations. None of these issues are likely to rank anywhere near the top of a list of “most important issues” identified by the American public. They are complex matters that seldom get sustained media attention. Political elites, though, have lavished considerable attention on each of these issues, for several reasons. First, they often reflect partisan divisions. Republicans and Democrats differ on most of these issues, with each party making principled arguments that coincide with its partisan interests. In addition, important interest groups—such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Common Cause, and the AFL-CIO—have pushed their own positions regarding these controversies. A small but significant group of political activists in the American population has devoted time, oratory, and resources to the issues as well. Along with campaign finance (addressed in chapter 6), the four matters listed above comprise the top electoral reform topics of recent years.

All four matters affect important goals of the electoral system in noteworthy ways. The debate over whether to reform or replace the electoral college involves defining how the electoral system should allow the public to hold a president accountable for actions in office. Revising the administration of elections affects their operation as a means of accountability and may strongly influence electoral turnout. Census counting and redistricting

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
You Call This An Election? America's Peculiar Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction - Peculiar, Indeed 1
  • Chapter I - What an Electoral System Can Do 11
  • Chapter 2 - Compared to What? 33
  • Chapter 3 - Why Turnout Fell 55
  • Chapter 4 - Direct Democracy or Legislative Government? 77
  • Chapter 5 - Four Controversies 97
  • Chapter 6 - What Sort of Democracy? 127
  • Conclusion - Less Peculiar 145
  • Notes 149
  • References 151
  • Index 161
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 166

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.