Voices of Emancipation: Understanding Slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction through the U.S. Pension Bureau Files

By Elizabeth A. Regosin; Donald R. Shaffer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

We'd like to thank the History Department at St. Lawrence University for two generous research grants that enabled us to collect materials at the National Archives. In addition, we'd like to thank the Sponsored Programs and Academic Research Center and the School of History, Philosophy, and Political Science at the University of Northern Colorado for additional research funding.

In the early stages of collecting documents, Madeline Kenney, who was then an undergraduate student at St. Lawrence University, helped us enormously both by collecting documents in the National Archives and by helping to organize and catalog them. A kindred spirit, Madeline shares our deep attachment to the Civil War pension files.

We owe Deborah Gershenowitz, our editor at NYU Press, a deep debt of gratitude for her long-time support and enthusiasm for this project.

We would like to thank Prologue, the quarterly of the National Archives, for generously sharing document images they produced for an article we published with them in December 2005 for use in this book. Similarly, we would like to express our gratitude to the University Press of Kansas for sharing images from Don's book After the Glory: The Struggles of Black Civil War Veterans and for allowing them to be published here.

Liz would like to thank her colleagues in the dean's office at St. Lawrence University—Karin Blackburn, Nancy Bovay, Lorie MacKenzie, and Grant Cornwell—for their unrelenting encouragement and support. On countless occasions, it was they who sent Liz off to the library so that she would get her work done and they who would let her interrupt their work so that she could read them passages from the files or ask them to comment on her writing. Don would like to thank his former colleagues at the University of Northern Colorado for their advice and support through the early stages of this project. Finally, we wish to thank our respective spouses and children for their support and for giving us the time away from them to complete this work.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Voices of Emancipation: Understanding Slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction through the U.S. Pension Bureau Files
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 219

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.