Hungary in the Cold War, 1945-1956: Between the United States and the Soviet Union

By LÁszlÓ Borhi | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

As with all manuscripts, this too owes to colleagues and friends who read and commented on it. First of all I am greatly indebted to Martin J. Sherwin, Günter Bischof, Mark Kramer and Mihály Szegedy-Maszák, who not only shared with me their intellectual resources, but also encouraged me to pursue this project. I am greatly indebted to Joanna McGarry, who helped me put this manuscript into its final form. I also wish to thank (in alphabetical order) those who read the whole or parts of the manuscript at different phases of readiness: Magda Ádám, Csaba Békés, Magdolna Baráth, Tibor Frank, John Lewis Gaddis, Tibor Hajdu, István Kozma, György Litván, Geir Lundestad, Vojtech Mastny, Tamás Meszerics, Zsuzsa L. Nagy, Attila Pók, János M. Rainer, Péter Sipos, István Vida, Odd Arne Westad. They all claim credit for all the virtues, but I alone assume responsibility for the faults. Numerous institutions provided financial support, hospitable and generous background for the research and writing of this book. Most of all I owe gratitude to my own institution, the Institute of History of the Hungarian Academy Sciences and its Director, Ferenc Glatz, who took me to the institute as a young researcher. In addition I am highly thankful also to James Hershberg and Cold War International History of the Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington D.C., École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales Paris, the National Security Archives Washington D.C., the Norwegian Nobel Institute Oslo and the Russian Academy of Sciences. The Soros Foundation Budapest gave financial support for my research in Moscow. Finally I must thank the staffs of all the libraries and archives that I used throughout the long years of this project. I wish to make special mention of Magyar Országos Levéltár, the National Archives Washington D.C., the National Security Archives Washington D.C. and the Library of the Norwegian Nobel Institute. Last but not least I want to thank my wife Csilla, who supported and helped me throughout.

-ix-

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