The Debate over Corporate Social Responsibility

By Steve May; George Cheney et al. | Go to book overview

Contributors

ABOUT THE EDITORS

George Cheney (Ph.D., Purdue University, 1985) is Professor of Communication at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, where he also serves as Director of Peace and Conflict Studies. In addition, he is Adjunct Professor of Management Communication at the University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Cheney's teaching and research interests include identity and power at work, democracy and labor, quality of work life, professional ethics, the marketization of society, and the rhetoric of war and peace. He has authored, coauthored, or co-edited six books and has published more than 80 journal articles, book chapters, and reviews. Recognized for both teaching and research, he has lectured, taught, and conducted research in Western Europe and Latin America, in addition to the United States and New Zealand. He is a past chair of the Organizational Communication Division of the National Communication Association and is a senior associate editor for Organization. He has consulted for organizations in the public, private, and non-profit sectors and is a strong advocate of service learning in the community beyond the university.

Steve May (Ph.D., University of Utah, 1993) is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is also currently a Leadership Fellow at the Institute for the Arts and the Humanities and an Ethics Fellow at the Parr Ethics Center. In addition, he serves as an ethics researcher and consultant for the Ethics at Work program at Duke University's Kenan Institute for Ethics. His research focuses on the relationship between work and identity, as it relates to the boundaries of public/private, work/family, and labor/leisure. Most recently, he has studied the challenges and opportunities for organizational ethics and corporate social responsibility. His most recent books include Case Studies in Organiza- tional Communication: Ethical Perspectives and Practices (2006) and Engaging Organizational Communication Theory and Research: Multiple Perspectives (2005). In addition to his publications in journals, he is also a past Forum Editor of Management Communication Quarterly.

Juliet Roper (PhD, University of Waikato, 2000) is Professor of Management Communication at the Waikato Management School, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Roper is currently the Sustainability Convenor for the Waikato Management School, representative for the school's membership of the European Academy of Business in Society, and founder of the Asia Pacific Academy of Business in Society. She was a 2006 finalist for the Faculty Pioneer Award for External Impact from the Aspen Institute and World Resources Institute. Her research and teach

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