A People's History of the European Court of Human Rights

By Michael D. Goldhaber | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 15
The Roma Challenge

School desegregation was the issue that kick-started the golden age of American rights jurisprudence, with the 1954 decision of Brown v. Board of Education. In Europe, the rights of equality seem to be the last on the agenda. The issue is at last being forced by a group of Czech Roma children, who have produced statistics to make a Selma school superintendent blush. Their case is destined to be remembered either as Europe's Brown v. Board of Education, or—more likely—as the Brown v. Board of Education that wasn't. There's no doubt that the Roma, more commonly known as gypsies, suffer deep discrimination. But in responding, the European Court of Human Rights is hampered by a caseload crisis and a narrow mandate on equality.


The African Americans of Europe

Like Africans in the New World, the Roma in the Roma region of Wallachia were enslaved outright for centuries. The experience of that particular Roma community was extreme, but through much of Europe, the status of today's Roma resembles that of blacks in America before the civil rights movement. Stereotyped as criminals, they must contend with police brutality and, in some cases, state-condoned mob violence. Trapped in the region's most depressed economies, they face discrimination in jobs and housing—and segregation in schools.

The former Czechoslovakia presents a microcosm of the Roma experience, because, culturally, it straddles Eastern and Western Europe. In the industrialized Czech lands, the Roma followed the pattern of their brethren in the West, wandering from town to town, serving as horse dealers, fortune tellers, folk doctors, beggars, and petty thieves. Rural Slovakia fit the sedentary pattern of Eastern Europe, where the mass of Roma have always lived. In Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, and Slovakia, the Roma exceed

-159-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A People's History of the European Court of Human Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 226

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.