Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy

By Louise W. Knight | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
CULTURE
1883–86

Favored with good weather, the Servia arrived off Queenstown, Ireland, a week after leaving New York Harbor. The crossing had produced some seasickness among the traveling party but nothing unpleasant enough to dampen their high spirits. Jane wrote to her sister Alice in mid-ocean, “I hope you are feeling as cheerful as we do. … The party is jolly and goodnatured.” Her health was also improving. “The salt breeze acts on me like magic,” she reported. “I feel quite rested.”1

The trip was a great adventure for Addams and, although she did not know it, the beginning of a new phase of existence. Plunged into the meaning-laden world of Europe, she would be once more drawn into the life of ideas she had enjoyed at Rockford, but this time she would have no like-minded people with whom to share it. She would become a kind of intellectual hermit, posing questions to herself that only she could answer. From the outside, as the trip began, she seemed the quiescent tourist and agreeable daughter. In truth she had entered a period of incubation from which she would emerge transformed.

As the steamer crossed the Atlantic, the travelers, consulting maps and guidebooks, sketched out their journey for the first year. After visiting Ireland, Scotland, and northern England, they would spend three weeks in London, then travel to Holland before settling in Dresden, Germany, for the winter. In the spring they would travel to Italy, Austria, Switzerland, and France. The party's size would shrink in time. Mary Penfield and her daughter would split off quite soon. The Ellwoods and Alida Young would return home in April 1884. Then, for a few months, it would be only Jane, Anna, and Sarah Hostetter. In June George Haldeman, on vacation from Johns Hopkins University, would join them. The group planned to spend the summer in Great Britain, after which George and Sarah would depart for the United States and Anna and Jane, if their stamina held, would spend another winter in Europe before heading home.2

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Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations x
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - The Given Life 1860–88 7
  • Chapter 1 - Self-Reliance 1822–60 9
  • Chapter 2 - Three Mothers 1860–73 34
  • Chapter 3 - Dreams 1873–77 56
  • Chapter 4 - Ambition 1877–81 80
  • Chapter 5 - Failure 1881–83 109
  • Chapter 6 - Culture 1883–86 130
  • Chapter 7 - Crisis 1886–88 158
  • Part Two - The Chosen Life 1889–99 177
  • Chapter 8 - Chicago 1889 179
  • Chapter 9 - Halsted Street 1889–91 199
  • Chapter 10 - Fellowship 1892 229
  • Chapter 11 - Baptism 1893 260
  • Chapter 12 - Cooperation 1893–94 282
  • Chapter 13 - Claims 1894 306
  • Chapter 14 - Justice 1895 334
  • Chapter 15 - Democracy 1896–98 363
  • Chapter 16 - Ethics 1898–99 384
  • Afterword : Scholarship and Jane Addams 405
  • Abbreviations 413
  • Notes 417
  • Bibliography 523
  • Index 565
  • Captions 583
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