Moved to Action: Motivation, Participation, and Inequality in American Politics

By Hahrie Han | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I HAVE MANY PEOPLE TO THANK for help with this project. Writing the book has been an exhilarating, at times frustrating, but ultimately rewarding journey. David Brady, Mo Fiorina, and Jon Krosnick deserve special thanks for their help in the early stages of this project. No one deserves more thanks (or blame) for making me stick with political science than David Brady. From our first discussions about Texas to our many discussions about this project, Brady has been uncommonly generous, not only with advice but also with Sunday afternoon time on his back porch, tickets to Stanford baseball games, and too many lunches and dinners to count. As a mentor, colleague, and friend, he has taught me an enormous amount about research, political science, and life. For that, I owe him an enormous intellectual and personal debt. Luckily we often have contradictory predictions about politics, and I trust I'll whittle away my debt through more wagers over the years. Serendipity put me into contact with Jon, and his work on issue publics eventually laid the foundation for this project. Laying this foundation, however, was no easy task. Jon kindly provided a lot of thoughtful advice, constructive critiques, and time. Mo Fiorina never failed to make incisive comments, modeling the precision and panache that characterize his writing and thinking. I hope to someday think as clearly as he does about the questions—and answers—in my research.

Many others helped shape the project into a book. Paul Sniderman has been amazing in helping me develop ideas for the book and navigate my way through the writing process. He was the first person to make the distinction between the personal and the political, and it took me two years to understand the wisdom of what he was saying. The acuity of his advice never surprises me, but I am repeatedly surprised by how generous someone as busy as Paul can be to a young scholar. Marshall Ganz has been a friend and mentor since college and has always challenged me

-ix-

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