Moved to Action: Motivation, Participation, and Inequality in American Politics

By Hahrie Han | Go to book overview

APPENDIX D

The 2003 National Purpose,
Local Action Study
The National Purpose, Local Action project was conducted in the summer of 2003 as a result of discussions with Sierra Club leaders concerned about the unrealized potential of their 750,000 members, 343 local groups, and 62 chapters. In the complete study, there were five different data sources. In this book, only data from the ExCom Leader Survey (ELS) was used. These are written surveys with Sierra Club Executive Committee (ExCom) members on background, leadership, and organizational practices. The fifteen-page ELS was completed by 1,624 ExCom members. The surveys were completed prior to participation in local meetings to assess organizational practices led by volunteer facilitators and conducted from October 2003 to February 2004. The survey includes closed-ended and open-ended questions on the background, leadership experience, goals and motivations, and organizational practices of local leaders, as well as their evaluation of the practices and efficacy of their own ExCom. A description of the variables from this study that were included in the analysis in this book follows.Now, take some time to think about the long-term goals, values, and motivations that led you to become active in the Sierra Club. What were your long-term goals? Check the box next to your top THREE goals. Then, circle the ONE long-term goal that is most important to you.
Enjoy/explore the outdoors
Influence politics and public policy to protect the environment
Protect natural environments
Meet/work with like-minded people
Influence public opinion
Become a more effective advocate/activist/leader
Fulfill moral/civic responsibilities
Strengthen the Sierra Club
Please take a moment to think about how you feel about your experience as a volunteer leader in the Sierra Club. Circle the appropriate response to indicate how much you agree with each statement ranging from “Strongly Disagree” (1) to “Strongly Agree” (5).
My work in the Sierra Club influences many aspects of my life.
I really feel as if the ExCom's problems are my problems.
I often try to think of ways of doing my work on the ExCom more effectively.
I feel myself to be part of the ExCom in which I work.
What the Sierra Club stands for is very important to me.
I am proud to tell others that I am part of the Sierra Club.

-159-

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